Corrimony Chambered Cairn

Highland, United Kingdom

Built some 4,000 years ago, Corrimony Cairn is a passage grave of the Clava type. Built by neolithic farmers, skilled in working stone, they were the first people to domesticate animals, till the land and clear the forests for farming, their society was cooperative.

Corrimony Chambered Cairn was built for collective burials, the beliefs of the builders remain unknown, it is believed these people existed from 3,500BC to 1,500Bc. Each group had their own collective tomb, built with the help of other groups in the area, with feasts and gifts being given to the helpers.

The astronomical alignment and orientation (the entrance passage is orientated towards the south west), has led people to suggest that the builders of Corrimony Chambered Cairn believed in the migration of the souls of the dead to the stars.

There is eveidence in some tombs that the bodies were prepared for the journey, with the bodies being dimembered, ceramic vessels shattered and animal bones indicate food offerings. Fires were then lit so the tomb acted as a crematorium.

Pieces of the original capstone, decorated with cup-mark designs, are still to be seen on top of the cairn. For a monument built four thousand years ago, Corrimony Chambered Cairnis remarkably well preserved, the best example in the region. Corrimony-cairn5.jpgIt was excavated in 1952, in the centre of the cairn there was only a dark stain visible evidence that any remains had deteriorated in the acid soil.

There are 12 standing stones surrounding Corrimony Cairn, is suspected that some of these may have been added since the building of the original cairn.

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mauricio Molina (21 months ago)
It's a nice place to learn a little history, very well marked access and parking. A big description signed is posted and gives you an explanation of the site, you can go inside, but refrain from climbing to the top. There is a ring of standing stones around the Chamber and some of them have petroglyphs carved..
darren cole (21 months ago)
Well worth a visit in a quiet tranquil place
Johanna Campbell (2 years ago)
Fascinating Burial Cairn. Well signposted. Car park and interpretation board. Well worth the detour to discover some of Scotland's ancient past.
Breila von Holstein-Rathlou (2 years ago)
Such a beautiful place, and well worth the short drive to get there. A bit of history is posted on the entrance so you can get a bit more information on the Cairn itself as well as the land. Very peaceful area, with a lovely surrounding.
Neil Bates (2 years ago)
One of my favourite ancient sites. Calm and quiet. Informative information boards in the car park. Easy drive from Drumnadrochit.
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