Inverness Cathedral is the seat of the Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness, ordinary of the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness. The cathedral is the northernmost cathedral in mainland Britain and was the first new cathedral to be completed in Great Britain since the Reformation.

Bishop Robert Eden decided that the Cathedral for the united Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness should be in Inverness. The foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Charles Longley, in 1866 and construction was complete by 1869, although a lack of funds precluded the building of the two giant spires of the original design. The architect was Alexander Ross, who was based in the city. The cathedral is built of red Tarradale stone, with the nave columns of Peterhead granite.

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Founded: 1866-1869
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eman Isa (2 years ago)
Regardless of your faith, you would want to stop here. Beautiful architecture and design. Friendly people with lots of stories about the history of the Cathedral.
Delta Rubber Imports (2 years ago)
Inverness cathedral, dedicated to St.Andrew Calm and quiet place for stay with God,
Anthony Manmohan (2 years ago)
Free entry with unisex disabled toilets inside.
James McMichael (2 years ago)
Open to the public again, the Cathedral is beautiful inside. Entry is free, though you can make a donation via cash or card for the upkeep. There are also toilets available at the rear of the building. It’s definitely worth visiting, especially if you are on the path down to the Ness Islands or the Botanic Gardens.
Anni O'Neill (3 years ago)
Cathedral is beautiful,peaceful and majestic
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