Rait Castle is a ruined hall-house castle dating from the 13th century. The remains of the courtyard walls are nine feet high and also contain the remains of the Chapel of St Mary of Rait. The building was a two story building, measuring 20 metres by 10 metres. It had an unvaulted basement and an upper hall. The hall was entered from the outside and was protected by a portcullis and a drawbar. The walls of the castle are nearly 6 feet thick. A tower projects from one corner of the castle and there is a garderobe tower on the west side that projects nearly 13 feet.

The castle was originally a property of the Cumming (Comyn) family who were also known by the name of de Rait. Sir Alexander Rait killed the third Thane of Cawdor (chief of Clan Calder), and then fled south where he married the heiress of Hallgreen. The castle later passed from the Clan Cumming (Comyn) to the Clan Mackintosh and then to the Clan Campbell of Cawdor.

In 1442, when the castle passed to the Mackintoshes from the Clan Cumming a feast was held at the castle between the two families which ended in the slaughter of most of the Comyns. The laird blamed his daughter who he chased around the castle. She climbed out of a window but he chopped off her hands and she fell to her death. The castle is said to be haunted by her ghost, with no hands.

The Duke of Cumberland is said to have stayed at the castle before the Battle of Culloden in 1746, although the last recorded reference to the castle was in 1596.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Mcdonald (11 months ago)
Greatly disappointed that due to a couple of cows in the field we were unable to access the castle, the gate is great for leaning on and looking disappointed. Ill give the cow with horns a strong 5 stars for looking intimidating.
Matt Innes (14 months ago)
Cool little castle, worth a quick visit if you're in the area
Sheilz White (14 months ago)
Secluded and lots of character.
Smart History (18 months ago)
An impressive castle with significant remains in a lovely location.
Karen Vass (19 months ago)
We found this by accident when out for a drive. Lovely place and kids both loved it. There's 2 gates that you have to remember to close behind you and looks like on farm land
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