Tulloch Castle probably dates to the mid-16th century, when Duncan Bane was granted the barony of Tulloch in 1542. Over the years, it has served as a family home for members of the Bain family and Clan Davidson, as a hospital after the evacuation of Dunkirk, and as a hostel for the local education authority. It is currently used as a hotel and conference centre.

Tulloch Castle has been subject to several structural changes throughout its existence. There are two records of fires, in 1838 and 1845, when areas of the castle were destroyed. There are also records of renovations and extensions to the castle in 1513, 1665, 1675, 1747 and in the early 1920s when the roof was replaced, stonework around the windows was repaired and electric lighting was installed.

Tulloch Castle has many interesting features. A tunnel runs from the basement of the castle under the town of Dingwall to the old site of Dingwall Castle. The tunnel has now collapsed, but it is possible to view this passageway through an air vent on the front lawn of the castle’s grounds.

There is a Davidson cemetery in the grounds of the castle for family members and pets. The graveyard is surrounded by a metal fence and has become overgrown, though some of its headstones are still visible.

The castle had two gatehouses and entrance paths. The west gatehouse no longer exists but the other gatehouse still exists as a privately owned house. This gatehouse was built in 1876 and the path which connects it to the castle has become a public road. This road is still used as the main entrance to the castle today.

On a hill to the north of the castle stands 'Caisteal Gorach', a late 18th-century folly which was designed by Robert Adam for Duncan Davidson of Tulloch. The folly comprises a ruined round tower and flanking walls, and is a category A listed building.

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Remy said 5 years ago
It was Phyllis Vickers who in 1994 inherited the barony of Tulloch. The current Baron is Dr. David Willien of Tulloch.


Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

James Walsh (13 months ago)
Staff were excellent. Very helpful. Good food, clean and comfortable rooms. Nice Bar and Ross was excellent. Will definitely visit again. Thank you.?
Claire Cowie (13 months ago)
Me and my friend stayed here and had a great time. The room was lovely and clean, and fine and warm. Very comfy beds and pillows. The food was delicious and they offered a fantastic selection. All the staff we spoke with were so lovely and friendly. We both went on the ghost tour which was informative and interesting.. Only downside was we didn't encounter any ghostly going ons! Would highly recommend a visit.
Scott (14 months ago)
All I can say is wow! An amazing castle with amazing staff. They went above and beyond for us, providing incredible service for our stay. The food was great, and I would highly recommend eating here. A genuine old Scottish castle with fantastic charm
Heather Yuill (14 months ago)
Went for a weekend. Rooms looked amazing but we went on an itison deal. Would not recommend this. Think we had the servants room! Electric blow heater in the big dark cupboard for when the very old radiator wouldn't work.Very clean room but desperately needs refurbished. Good food and pleasant staff.
Janine Aversing (14 months ago)
Beautiful grounds. We had an entire floor! 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, living room, and dining room with coffee/tea station. We loved our stay
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