Kortrijk Béguinage

Kortrijk, Belgium

The Saint Elisabeth Béguinage (Begijnhof) from 1238 is a combination of a béguinage square and street and was added to UNESCO World Heritage List in 1998. The Kortrijk béguinage was surrounded by the castle of the Counts of Flanders, the city walls and the St. Martin's Church Cemetery and is situated between the Church of Our Lady and the St. Martin's Church. The Kortrijk béguinage has been destroyed several times and its current form dates back to the 17th century. It comprises forty small Baroque houses each with an enclosed front garden.

The house with the double stepped-gable (1649) belonged to the 'Grand Dame'. The remarkable stair turret is the corner tower of the former St. Anna hall from 1682. In the Sint-Annaroom you will find the new experience centre. Her you will be immersed in many centuries of history in a remarkably dynamic manner. The béguinage also includes three chapels, including the Gothic Saint Matthew Chapel from 1464 that was transformed into the Baroque style in the 18th century. House number 41, near the entrance to the béguinage, will be converted into a house museum.

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Founded: 1238
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www.toerismekortrijk.be

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kathleen García A (14 months ago)
Nice place with a Cafe inside for enjoying better the visit
thibault heylen (2 years ago)
Beautifull place, with Nice coffee shop
Amit Mittal (2 years ago)
Being with local is always fun and more informative, all the more when you are visiting a city in Belgium which is relatively not a touristic city and on radar of international travellers. Well I was touring Kortrijk in a business tour along with my local contact. Due to cancelled meeting had some free time to go around Kortrijk. Beguinage being one of the oldest living structure is of special reference. This used to be a place where war widows and women who wanted to lead a life without a partner lived. It is nicely built with similar villas all around a Courtyard. The women occupants of beguinage were supposed to live a religious lifestyle and often involved in activities to support their living. Now a days there is a cafe, art gallery and a museum on site. Renovations were going on at the time of visit.
Pascal Fastenakels (2 years ago)
Lovely site. Quirky layout with small cobble stone streets. There's a pub with traditionele beers and a small museum on site.
wolf schevelenbos (2 years ago)
A quiet and beautiful place to draw, not much else
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