Kortrijk Béguinage

Kortrijk, Belgium

The Saint Elisabeth Béguinage (Begijnhof) from 1238 is a combination of a béguinage square and street and was added to UNESCO World Heritage List in 1998. The Kortrijk béguinage was surrounded by the castle of the Counts of Flanders, the city walls and the St. Martin's Church Cemetery and is situated between the Church of Our Lady and the St. Martin's Church. The Kortrijk béguinage has been destroyed several times and its current form dates back to the 17th century. It comprises forty small Baroque houses each with an enclosed front garden.

The house with the double stepped-gable (1649) belonged to the 'Grand Dame'. The remarkable stair turret is the corner tower of the former St. Anna hall from 1682. In the Sint-Annaroom you will find the new experience centre. Her you will be immersed in many centuries of history in a remarkably dynamic manner. The béguinage also includes three chapels, including the Gothic Saint Matthew Chapel from 1464 that was transformed into the Baroque style in the 18th century. House number 41, near the entrance to the béguinage, will be converted into a house museum.

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www.toerismekortrijk.be

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User Reviews

Piu N (17 months ago)
This has to be the best surprise i found, while walking in the streets of kortjijk. Intriguing place where people of church used to reside, sucha quiet, quaint place.. but there was a church which kinda spooked me out .. maybe I was wrong.. but overall very pretty &must see
Matej Pazdič (2 years ago)
Very nice beguinage in Belgium. I think its my favourite. Charming also at night.
Alan Lupatini (2 years ago)
One pleasant surprise in our road trip.
Gary McMahon (2 years ago)
I'm sure this place is important and historic but there's not much to see from a tourist perspective.
Kathleen García A (2 years ago)
Nice place with a Cafe inside for enjoying better the visit
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