Church of Our Lady

Bruges, Belgium

The Church of Our Lady in Bruges dates mainly from the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries. Its tower, at 122.3 metres in height, remains the tallest structure in the city and the second tallest brickwork tower in the world.

In the choir space behind the high altar are the tombs of Charles the Bold, last Valois Duke of Burgundy, and his daughter, the duchess Mary. The gilded bronze effigies of both father and daughter repose at full length on polished slabs of black stone. Both are crowned, and Charles is represented in full armor and wearing the decoration of the Order of the Golden Fleece.

The altarpiece of the large chapel in the southern aisle enshrines the most celebrated art treasure of the church—a white marble sculpture of the Madonna and Child created by Michelangelo around 1504. Probably meant originally for Siena Cathedral, it was purchased in Italy by two Brugean merchants, the brothers Jan and Alexander Mouscron, and in 1514 donated to its present home. The sculpture was twice recovered after being looted by foreign occupiers—French revolutionaries c. 1794 and Nazi Germans in 1944. Close to the Michelangelo statue important Brugeans are buried such as Françoise de Haveskercke, buried next to her husband in the black tomb of the Haveskercke family on the right side of the statue.

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Address

Mariastraat, Bruges, Belgium
See all sites in Bruges

Details

Founded: 1270
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lisa Coker (8 months ago)
The most amazing place I have ever had the privilege to experience! Totally breathtaking! Surreal! It touches your soul.
Globetrot With Mikalys (12 months ago)
A very beautiful well illuminated church. Unfortunately, in order to get to see the Madonna and baby Jesus of Michelangelo, you have to buy a ticket for the museum
Carl Johnson (13 months ago)
Beautiful art, but the lady taking tickets is quite possibly the rudest person I have ever encountered. More training please.
Francis De Cannière (17 months ago)
Beautiful church, impressive tombs, exquisite grave paintings. Recommend to visit Gruuthuse museum too as there is a literal link between the two buildings.
Mario Capone (2 years ago)
Found this wonderful place by accident. Being an art lover my entire life, I was blown away to find out they housed a Michelangelo sculpture and a Caravaggio painting, amongst other great works. This church ended up inadvertently checking off a bucket list item:) Thanks Brugge!
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