Basilica of the Holy Blood

Bruges, Belgium

The Basilica of the Holy Blood is a Roman Catholic minor basilica in Bruges. Originally built in the 12th century as the chapel of the residence of the Count of Flanders, the church houses a venerated relic of the Holy Blood allegedly collected by Joseph of Arimathea and brought from the Holy Land by Thierry of Alsace, Count of Flanders. Built between 1134 and 1157, it was promoted to minor basilica in 1923.

The 12th-century basilica is located in the Burg square and consists of a lower and upper chapel. The lower chapel dedicated to St. Basil the Great is a dark Romanesque structure that remains virtually unchanged. The venerated relic is in the upper chapel, which was rebuilt in the Gothic style during the 16th century and renovated multiple times during the 19th century in Gothic Revival style.

Legend has it that after the Crucifixion, Joseph of Arimathea wiped blood from the body of Christ and preserved the cloth. The relic remained in the Holy Land until the Second Crusade, when the King of Jerusalem Baldwin III gave it to his brother-in-law, Count of Flanders Diederik van de Elzas. The count arrived with it in Bruges on April 7, 1150 and placed it in a chapel he had built on Burg Square.

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Address

Burg 13, Bruges, Belgium
See all sites in Bruges

Details

Founded: 1134-1157
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rodrigo Fernandez (2 years ago)
I ran into this place by accident and I am so happy that happened. Turns out this church is the host of the sacred jesus's blood and it's guarded always by priests. The architecture is incredible and it holds an amazing history.
Shyam Sundar (2 years ago)
Well maintained cathedral more of visitors place to view very rare relic. It’s believed to be the blood of Jesus Christ preserved. Need to be silent and not headgear/cap to be worn. Strictly no photograph. Wait in line and will have chance to view the relic in close proximity. Well managed.
Sam Red (2 years ago)
This place has the real blood of Jesus. Went there few times but last visit was on good Friday. Amazing experience in the church.
jennifer bergeron (2 years ago)
To be honest, I'm giving five stars because I can't believe anyone can give a one star review to a place where people have prayed for over 1000 years in the presence of a piece of cloth they believe to be stained with the blood of their Saviour. I was 100% moved. Please don't let the blood of Christ get a 4.5 star review on Google! What is this world coming to?
Aaron Monson (3 years ago)
One of my favorite places to visit in Bruges. Incredible that it is nearly 1000 years old. Highly recommend it. The chapel is too small for strollers but they let you park it on the ground floor. The holy blood relic was available to view between 11:30-12:00.
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