Hortus Botanicus Lovaniensis

Leuven, Belgium

The Hortus Botanicus Lovaniensis is the oldest botanical garden of Belgium, dating from 1738. The botanical garden has always been linked with the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. It first aim was to provide herbs for medical use. Later, the gardens became used for study purposes and they hosted an extensive collection of ornamental plants, cultivated plants that could possibly be used for economic purposes and rare plants. Despite the differentiating in use, in popular language the garden is still called the Dutch equivalent for 'herbgarden' (Kruidtuin).

Nowadays the Botanical Garden is maintained by the municipality of Leuven. In contrast with many other botanical gardens, this garden has free access and is used extensively by tourists and citizens alike. The garden functions sometimes as a place of exhibition for contemporary art.

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    Founded: 1738
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    4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Tinku Thomas (2 years ago)
    It's a beautiful place to see in spring, relaxing place In summer.
    jane hermans (2 years ago)
    Beautiful, inside and out. Even the kids loved it.
    Réka Peace (2 years ago)
    The oldest botanical garden in Belgium and the most beautiful one i have so far visited in Europe. Jawdropping variety, plants and trails in great condition, arranged with care and real feel for details. Fishponds, streams, fountains and sculptures make it even more exceptional. A truly beautiful place for a lone stroll, reading or a date. The area is also worth a visit and the greenhouses are magical!
    Desislava Tosheva (2 years ago)
    My lovely place! Very good botanical garden! It was originally set up as a garden with rare species and spices for the needs of the University of Medicine. On the territory there is a greenhouse with exotic plants.
    Ekaterina Kovalenko (3 years ago)
    Very beautiful place for rest in calm environment. Must see for everyone. Kids would be exited by intersecting fishes and cactuses, adults will have just a pleasure to stay in such nice park.
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