Mechelen Town Hall

Mechelen, Belgium

Mechelen town hall on the Grote Markt consists of two parts: the cloth hall with unfinished belfry and the Palace of the Great Council. The cloth trade went into decline in the 14th century and there wasn't the money to complete the building. For two hundred years the belfry was no more than a shell, until it was eventually provided with a temporary roof in the 16th century. The belfry is now a UNESCO world heritage site. On the right of the belfry you can see the oldest part of the town hall, the remains of the earlier cloth hall. On the left is the Palace of the Great Council. The Great Council never actually met here, because this wing was only completed in the twentieth century in accordance with the original sixteenth-century plans of the then leading architect Rombout Keldermans. The interior of the Town Hall is well worth seeing.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Belgium

More Information

toerisme.mechelen.be

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marc Wouters (2 years ago)
Renovated, that means completely modernised inside (this is a city-hall with people working there) in the 1970's and stone by original stone rebuilt on the outside for locals and visitors alike to admire. You can pass through coming from the Befferstraat to the Grote Markt or the other way around. Picture made from above on the Cathedral tower (97,5 meters high). Vlaams: volledig vernieuwd gedurende de 1970ties binnen waar de mensen werken en steen per steen herbouwd aan de buitenkant voor de bewonderende blikken van Maneblussers en bezoekers. Waarom niet binnengaan om op het pleintje een mooi beeldhouwwerk te beschouwen. Doen! Foto van boven op "den Toure".
Emil Georgiev (2 years ago)
Cute
ΒΑΣΙΛΗΣ ΚΑΡΑΟΓΛΑΝΗΣ (2 years ago)
Το δημαρχείο της πόλης βρίσκεται στην ανατολική πλευρά της Grote Markt και αποτελείται από τρία μέρη: • το Παλάτι του Μεγάλου Συμβουλίου • το καμπαναριό • το Cloth Hall Από το 1914 , τα 3 κτήρια λειτουργούν ως δημαρχείο. Παλάτι του Μεγάλου Συμβουλίου Το παλάτι χτίστηκε το 1526 για τις συνεδριάσεις του μεγάλου συμβούλιου της πόλης . Το κτίριο , όμως , δεν ολοκληρώθηκε ποτέ , τα οικονομικά προβλήματα το εμπόδισαν και παρέμεινε ημιτελές για σχεδόν 400 χρόνια. Μεταξύ 1900 - 1911 ολοκληρώθηκε σύμφωνα με τα αρχικά σχέδια του 16ου αιώνα σε νεογοτθικό στυλ . Στο παλάτι τελούνται γάμοι και συνεδριάζει το συμβούλιο της πόλης. Μια αίθουσα έχει ένα μωσαϊκό του 16ου που απεικονίζει τη μάχη της Τύνιδας. Belfort Το καμπαναριό είναι στον κατάλογο των Μνημείων Παγκόσμιας Πολιτιστικής Κληρονομιάς της UNESCO . Πρόκειται για ένα γοτθικό κτήριο του 14ου αιώνα και πολλά μπαρόκ στοιχεία του 17ου αιώνα . Ο ίδιος ο πύργος δεν ολοκληρώθηκε ποτέ πλήρως , όπως έχει προγραμματιστεί. Το Cloth Hall Το Cloth Hall χτίστηκε τον 14ο αιώνα και χρησιμοποιήθηκε για το εμπόριο κλωστοϋφαντουργικών προϊόντων . Το 1342 καταστράφηκε από πυρκαγιά και ανακαινίστηκε από την αρχή .
Sophie's Foodie Files (3 years ago)
A lovely majestic old city hall that combines 3 buildings: the belfry, the palace of the big council & the cloth hall! It dates back from around 1526.
Rodrigo D (4 years ago)
Outstanding. More sculpture than building.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.