Bornem Castle, also known as the De Marnix de Sainte-Aldegonde Castle, stands on the Oude Schelde, a tributary of the Scheldt. The earliest fortification on the site was of the 10th or 11th centuries and was intended to defend against the incursions of the Normans. A later castle was built on the foundations of the older building in 1587 by the Spanish nobleman Pedro Coloma, lord of Bobadilla, a follower of Alexander Farnese. The property was afterwards leased by the family de Marnix de Sainte-Aldegonde, who became the outright owners in 1773.

The present house was built on the same site at the end of the 19th century to plans by Hendrik Beyaert, after the remains of the 16th century building had been demolished. It remains in ownership of the house Marnix de Sainte-Aldegonde, the current resident is John de Marnix de Sainte-Aldegonde, 14th Earl of Bornem.

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Address

Kasteelstraat, Bornem, Belgium
See all sites in Bornem

Details

Founded: 1880
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kang Korasak (20 months ago)
Love the place
Catalin Bogdan (4 years ago)
Beautiful castle. It's a pity that it's only open few days per year.
Catalin Bogdan (4 years ago)
Beautiful castle. It's a pity that it's only open few days per year.
Geert Loosveld (4 years ago)
Well hidden castle in a great nature trail - castle only visitable by appointment - lots of free walking opportunities all around in this very quiet and green castle grounds
Geert Loosveld (4 years ago)
Well hidden castle in a great nature trail - castle only visitable by appointment - lots of free walking opportunities all around in this very quiet and green castle grounds
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