The Lion's Mound is a large conical artificial hill in Braine-l'Alleud. King William I of the Netherlands ordered its construction in 1820, and it was completed in 1826. It commemorates the location on the battlefield of Waterloo where a musket ball hit the shoulder of William II of the Netherlands (the Prince of Orange) and knocked him from his horse during the battle. It is also a memorial of the Battle of Quatre Bras, which had been fought two days earlier, on 16 June 1815.

A statue of a lion standing upon a stone-block pedestal surmounts the hill. Jean-François Van Geel (1756–1830) sculpted the model lion, which closely resembles the 16th-century Medici lions. The lion is the heraldic beast on the personal coat of arms of the monarch of The Netherlands, and symbolizes courage.

Its right front paw is upon a sphere, signifying global victory. William Cockerill's iron foundry in Liège cast the lion, in sections; a canal barge brought those pieces to Brussels; from there, heavy horse-drays drew the parts to Mont-St-Jean, a low ridge south of Waterloo.

There is a legend that the foundry melted down brass from cannons that the French had left on the battlefield, in order to cast the metal lion. In reality, the foundry made nine separate partial casts in iron, and assembled those components into one statue at the monument site.

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Founded: 1820
Category: Statues in Belgium

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elena Lee (9 months ago)
Been there twice and both times loved it. The museum is cool. The stuff was friendly and helpful. The restaurant nearby has a kids’ play area inside, where kids could play while we were waiting on food to arrive.
Robert Crawford (9 months ago)
Great museum! Worth the price! If you want to go to the top of the Lions Mound be ready to use some leg power up the 226 steps!
Sebastian S (9 months ago)
Nice outlook. I think even better if the weather is fine. The stairs are not for everyone. Going straight up and they have not the best condition. Not recommendable during rain. If I remember well, it's more than 200 steps.
Jake Mcgrath (10 months ago)
Great view of the battlefield from the top. Would have been nice if there was a bit more information about the battle at the top
Thea Di Staola (13 months ago)
This experience was amazing! Going up to the "Butte du Lion", seeing the breathtaking landscape of Waterloo was one of the best experiences during my Belgium trip. The past years the entrance was free, but now it costs about 15€, and you can visit the museum too. It's absolutely worth the price.
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