Château d'Hougoumont

Braine-l'Alleud, Belgium

Château d'Hougoumont (originally Goumont) is a large farmhouse situated at the bottom of an escarpment near the Nivelles road in Braine-l'Alleud, where British and other allied forces faced Napoleon's Army at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

In 1474 the Order of Saint John bought the area of estate. A building had apparently been erected on the land as it was sold in 1536 to Pierre du Fief, attorney-general to the Council of Brabant, who subsequently enlarged the property considerably. In 1562 the estate became the property of Pierre Quarré and stayed in the Quarré family until 1637 when it was bought by Arnold Schuyl, Lord of Walhorn. It was around this time that the present building was erected.

In June 1815 the chateau became an epicenter of fighting in the Battle of Waterloo as it was one of the first places where British and other allied forces faced Napoleon's Army.

In his novel Les Misérables, Victor Hugo describes how 300 bodies were thrown down a well at Hougoumont. Several historians have noted that an archaeological dig of the well by Derick Saunders in 1985 turned up no human remains in a well rediscovered at the site. In doing so, they state that it debunks a myth made popular by Hugo.

Hougoumont remained an active farm until the end of the 20th century. In 2003 a settlement was found between Count Guibert d'Oultremont, owner of the farm, and the Regional Authority after which it became the property of the Intercommunale (1815). By June 2006, the farm appeared to be derelict. The walls, which were once near pristine white, have become a dirty yellow. Several walls are cracked and parts are clearly damaged, most notably the right-hand door post of the north side gate.

Project Hougoumont was set up to oversee funding to restore and preserve Hougoumont for the long-term future. The project was completed in June 2015. Charles, Prince of Wales, unveiled a memorial at Hougoumont dedicated to the British soldiers who fought in the battle. The memorial by Vivien Mallock stands next to the north gate and shows two life-size soldiers struggling to close the critical gates of the farm to save it from being overrun by the French. The next day Hougoumont was opened to the public on the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerald Perry Marin (5 months ago)
Expectation
Md Tawhid Hossain (7 months ago)
Historical place with a lot of emotion
Axel Kuechle (7 months ago)
The Video Performance was ridiculous, involving 3 rotating screens, presenting time and again the same half relief on the one side. Notwithstanding the importance of the old farm for the victory over Napoléon, to me the best of Hougoumont today are the old trees which give a palpable testimony of the past.
林經緯 (7 months ago)
Good to visit here to know the history of Waterloo battle in 1815. However, in my opinion, the statistic exhibitions (posts, Archaeological items) are not attractive, the building and landscape looks normal and nothing special. BUT! If you have seen/googled the story of Hougoumont Farm in Battle of Waterloo before you arrive here, you will be able to imagine what happened here two hundred years ago and be impressed by that. How could such a normal farm become a tragic one-day battle. There is a nice "3D" film in this small farm and I highly recommend you to watch it! And, the audio has Chinese and Japanese version! (Don't be as silly as we did, asked an English version and lost in those names and terms)
Axel Vanderoost (8 months ago)
Absolutely recommend to visit this museum. The Sound & Light show is one of a kind. Emotional place.
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