The original Neuburg castle was built in the early Middle Ages by the Agilolfings noble family. This was acquired by the Wittelsbach dukes in 1247. When Count Palatine Otto Henry began his rule in Palatinate-Neuburg in 1522, he found a medieval fortified castle in his residence city of Neuburg, which, unlike similar than other royal residences was still not adjusted for the demands of a modern royal court. So from 1527 he ordered to re-design the castle into a Renaissance palace and to expand the artistic quality and condition to one of the most important palaces of the first half of the 16th Century in Germany. From 1537 an additional west wing was added which also includes the chapel. With his conversion to the Lutheran doctrine in 1541 the Palatine Chapel was decorated with excellent facilities, the antique-style Italian picture program painted in 1543 has been obtained. The chapel was decorated with famous frescoes by the Salzburg church painter Hans Bocksberger the Elder. The chapel is the oldest Protestant church in Bavaria. Because of the financial difficulties and bankruptcy of Otto Henry in 1544, the construction of the west wing took a long time.

Wolfgang, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken, who succeeded his cousin Otto Henry in the Duchy of Palatinate-Neuburg, ordered in 1562 to decorate the west wing facing the courtyard with elaborate Sgraffito decorations. The Knights' Hall (the lower panel room in north building) was provided in 1575 by Hans Pihel with a coffered ceiling and wall panels from a rotating timber, both of which are original. The impressive east wing was rebuilt in 1665 by Philip William, Elector Palatine in the Baroque style and complemented with two round towers.

Today the castle houses a gallery of baroque paintings, the museum is under supervision of the Bavarian State Picture Collection.

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Details

Founded: 1527
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tony (4 months ago)
Very Interesting and beautiful
mhm1g11 (5 months ago)
Nice Castel
Dandylicious (6 months ago)
Absolutely magnificent Renaissance Palace which was built and re-designed by Count Palatine Ottheinrich from 1527 onwards. If you are interested in (not just Wittelsbach) history you will find rich collections of all kinds of artifacts respectively artworks. In addition, me, myself and I was stunned by the modern presentation inside the Flemish Gallery which is full of high-class masterpieces. Totally worth the trip.
Dmitry Kravtsov (2 years ago)
It is really interesting how the old castle is incorporated in nowadays people living. And it is very nice inside and walking around.
dowdtim (2 years ago)
Most heart and soul has been completely removed and it is a museum. If you bring kids, expect to be not-so-subtly followed around by disenchanted security guards, ready to make remarks any time your kids actually behave like kids... Don't touch, don't get too close, don't run, don't be loud, etc.
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