Bayreuth New Palace

Bayreuth, Germany

After the Old Palace burned down, the new town residence (Neues Schloss) for Margrave Friedrich von Brandenburg-Bayreuth was begun by Joseph Saint-Pierre in 1753. Margravine Wilhelmine had considerable influence on its final form, designing some of the rooms herself, including the Cabinet of Fragmented Mirrors and the Old Music Room with its pastel portraits of singers, actors and dancers. The Palm Room with its outstanding walnut panelling is a typical example of the Rococo style in Bayreuth.

On the ground floor of the New Palace today the museums 'Margravine Wilhelmine's Bayreuth' and 'Bayreuth Faience – Rummel Collection' with outstanding items from the Bayreuth Manufactory can be seen. The faience collection covers the whole period of production from its beginnings until 1788. The Gallery Rooms contain Dutch and German paintings from the 18th century.

The rooms of the small but remarkable Italian Palace are an impressive example of the 'Bayreuth rococo' style in its later manifestation with the flower tendrils, trellis rooms and grottos that were its typical features.

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Details

Founded: 1753
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

More Information

www.schloesser.bayern.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Militza Santiago (2 years ago)
Beautiful place... You have to have the booster or a negative test to go into de Castle
Lim David (3 years ago)
The location is very centralised. The host, Maria has provided us super good service, too. We will come back again.
JST KSK (3 years ago)
Beautiful modern castle. A great view into history. Perfect for a day trip.
Krishna Ajay (3 years ago)
It’s old castle but historical
Radoslav Tsvetkov (Rado) (3 years ago)
Worthy collection. Very beautiful rococo and baroque exhibition. Beautiful interior.
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