Church of Our Lady

Nuremberg, Germany

The Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady) stands on the eastern side of the main market. An example of brick Gothic architecture, it was built on the initiative of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor between 1352 and 1362. The church contains many sculptures, some of them heavily restored. Numerous works of art from the Middle Ages are kept in the church, such as the so-called Tucher Altar (c. 1440, originally the high altar of the Augustinian church of St. Vitus), and two monuments by Adam Kraft (c. 1498).

The church was built in the grand market, in place of the former Jewish synagogue, which was destroyed during the pogrom of 1349 (which followed an outbreak of Black Death). The architect was probably Peter Parler. Charles IV wanted to use the Frauenkirche for imperial ceremonies, which is reflected in the porch with the balcony, and in the fact that the church is relatively unadorned except for the coats of arms of the Holy Roman Empire, the seven Electors, the town of Nuremberg, and the city of Rome, where the Holy Roman Emperors were crowned.

Charles IV's son Wenceslas was baptized in the church in 1361, on which occasion the Imperial Regalia, including the imperial reliquaries, were displayed to the people. Beginning in 1423, the Imperial Regalia was kept permanently in Nuremberg and displayed to the people once a year on a special wooden platform constructed for that purpose.

The Frauenkirche is a hall church with two aisles and a tribune for the emperor. The church contains nine bays supported by four columns. The triforium, named the Imperial Loft or St. Michael's Loft, opens on to the nave by means of an arcade, the arches of which are filled with floating tracery, consisting of three rosettes supported by a segmental arch. The narthex of the church contains tracery. All three sides of the narthex have portals, the jambs and archivolts of which are decorated with sculptures. The gable contains many niches, which used to house sculptures.

One of the most notable features of the church is the Männleinlaufen, a mechanical clock that commemorates the Golden Bull of 1356. The clock was installed in the church in 1506. The Holy Roman Emperor is shown seated with the prince-electors surrounding him.

The clock mechanism is activated at midday, a bell is rung to start the sequence followed by the trumpeters and drummer. Then there is a procession of the electors around the figure of the Holy Roman Emperor.

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Details

Founded: 1352-1362
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sudarshan Pise (2 months ago)
Beautiful structure and architecture.. maintained very well .. The Frauenkirche , today the Roman Catholic parish church of Our Lady , is one of Nuremberg 's most important churches on the east side of the main market . It was built at the instigation of Emperor Karl in the Parler period from 1352 to 1362 as a hall church with three by three bays ; on the west side, towards the market, there is a vestibule, in the east, in the width of the central nave , there is a two-bay choir with a 5/8 end . By Adam Kraftcomes the western gable with a tracery tabernacle for the so-called " Männleinlaufen " from 1509, which is still in use. Many high-quality sculptures from the time of construction around 1360 have been preserved (partly heavily restored).
Cheung Haynes (3 months ago)
The entrance room once you stepped inside the church was quite impressive.
B Hos (4 months ago)
A beautiful church with a little bit of unique history. The mechanical clock mounted to the front commemorates the golden bull of 1356 which required newly elected HRE emperors to hold their first diet in the city.
Michael Nish (9 months ago)
Frauenkirche or " The Church of Our Lady" is an example of brick Gothic architecture, and it was built on the initiative of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor (reign 1346-1378) between 1352 and 1362. The church contains many sculptures, some of them heavily restored. Numerous works of art from the Middle Ages are kept in the church, such as the so-called Tucher Altar (c. 1440, originally the high altar of the Augustinian church of St. Vitus also in Nürnberg). The church was built in the grand market, in place of the former Jewish synagogue, which was destroyed during the Nürnberg pogrom (Jewish persecutions of 1349) which followed an outbreak of Black Death. Charles IV wanted to use the Frauenkirche for imperial ceremonies, which is reflected in the porch with the balcony, and in the fact that the church is relatively unadorned except for the coats of arms of the Holy Roman Empire, the seven Electors, the town of Nürnberg, and the city of Rome, where the Holy Roman Emperors were crowned. Construction of the church continued until the 1360s. Charles IV's son Wenceslas was baptized in the church in 1361, on which occasion the Imperial Regalia, including the imperial reliquaries, were displayed to the people. References to Wenceslaus can be found throughout the sculptural program of the church. Beginning in 1423, the Imperial Regalia was kept permanently in Nürnberg and displayed to the people once a year on a special wooden platform constructed for that purpose. The current west gable of the church dates from 1506-8. Historic images show that this gable was once richly decorated with sculptures which were presumably destroyed in the Reformation. In 1525 the church became Lutheran and galleries were added in the aisles. One of the most notable features of the church is the Männleinlaufen, a mechanical clock that commemorates the Golden Bull of 1356. The clock was installed in the church between 1506 and 1509. The Holy Roman Emperor is shown seated with the prince-electors surrounding him . The clock mechanism is activated at noon when a bell is rung to start the sequence and is followed by the trumpeters and drummer. Then there is a procession of the electors around the figure of the Holy Roman Emperor.
Angie Brandt (13 months ago)
We were greeted with pipe organ music and enjoyed our brief visit at this church. 2€ recommended donation to visit. Please drop in the collection vessel upon entry.
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