St. Lorenz Church

Nuremberg, Germany

St. Lorenz (St. Lawrence) is a medieval church of the former free imperial city of Nuremberg. The nave of the church was completed by around . In 1439, work began on the choir in the form of a hall church in the late German sondergotik style of gothic architecture. The choir was largely completed by 1477 by Konrad Roriczer, although Jakob Grimm completed the intricate vaults.

In the choir one can find the carving of the Angelic Salutation by Veit Stoss, and the monumental tabernacle by Adam Kraft. The latter is notable for including a prominent figure of the sculptor himself.

The building and furnishing of the church was from the city council and wealthy citizens. This is probably the reason that the art treasures of St. Lawrence were spared during the iconoclasm during the Reformation period. Despite St. Lawrence being one of the first churches in Germany to be Lutheran (1525), the wealthy citizens of Nuremberg wanted to preserve the memory of their ancestors and refused the removal of the donated works of art.

The west facade is articulated richly reflecting the wealth of the Nuremberg citizens. The facade is dominated by the two towers, mirroring St. Sebald and indirectly Bamberg Cathedral with a sharp towering West portal doorway, and a well-indented rose window 9 metres in diameter.

The church was badly damaged during the Second World War and later restored. It is one of the most prominent churches of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Bavaria.

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Details

Founded: 1400
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

samer nohra (11 months ago)
Behold the an amazing architectural masterpiece. Heavily damaged during the war and fully restored witness to the turbulent times.
Christophe B (12 months ago)
Worth the trip. The church is beautifull and I finally understood who Luther was and why he was so influential at his time.
Alexander Halim (12 months ago)
St. Lorenz is a medieval church of the former free imperial city of Nuremberg in southern Germany. It is dedicated to Saint Lawrence. The church was badly damaged during the Second World War and later restored. It is one of the most prominent churches of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Bavaria.
Manish Patiyal (12 months ago)
Old Historic build, with Gothic architecture, market had lots of options for shoping and snacks
TheASSedoTV (13 months ago)
One enigmatic structure that always makes me want to come back and enjoy looking at it again and again. Incredible...
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