Hospital of the Holy Spirit

Nuremberg, Germany

Established from 1332 to 1339 as a foundation endowed by the wealthy patrician Konrad Groß for the elderly and needy. Considered the largest private endowment by any individual before 1500.

The Hospital of the Holy Spirit was established in 1332–39 by Konrad Gross, a wealthy patrician, for the care for the elderly and needy. It was the largest private endowment in the Holy Roman Empire up to 1500. After 1500 the building complex was extended over the Pegnitz according to plans by Hans Beheim the Elder. Two structures along the southern arm of the river and the north wall of the former hospital church with its polygonal ridge-turret survive.

From 1424 to 1796, the imperial regalia were kept in the hospital church (not reconstructed after the war). In the arcaded Kreuzigungshof, there are the central figures of Adam Kraft’s Crucifixion group (ca 1506/08) and the tomb monuments of Konrad Gross (d. 1356) and Herdegen Valzner (d. 1423).

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Details

Founded: 1332-1339
Category:
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

tourismus.nuernberg.de

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

roberto buti (3 years ago)
10 guest table, dish delivered in two ours one by one, when last one has been delivered the firts two gues had finished to eat. Note : they took my dish from anotherne table.....i'm been bewildered
Lu D (3 years ago)
Beautiful, unforgettable. They always have one delicious vegetarian dish option.
Ageliki Geobres (3 years ago)
Traditional German restaurant. Nice atmosphere good food, very fast service.
Filippo Orrù (3 years ago)
Very good food with limited number of vegetarian options and not cheap. Nice ambiente though
Marie-Louise Jensen (4 years ago)
A wonderful old German hall with wood carvings around each alcove and beautifully decorated. The service was friendly and professional. The menu is traditional German with meat dishes, and a bit more expensive than many other places, but there are some cheaper dishes available too, and well worth it to be in such great surroundings. Highly recommended.
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