St. Egidien Church

Nuremberg, Germany

St. Egidien is considered a significant contribution to the baroque church architecture of Middle Franconia.

The first church building was probably built in the years 1120/1130 on the site of the second, northern Nuremberg royal court. The royal courts administered royal possessions, agriculture and forestry. Thus, it had the status of a royal church.

Around the year 1140 Emperor Conrad III and his wife Gertrud raised the foundation to the rank of a benedictine abbey and endowed it generously. They made Carus, Abbot of the Scots Monastery, Regensburg, their royal chaplain and the first Abbot of St Egidien. The monastery was rich immediately and subordinate in secular terms only to the Holy Roman Emperor. The first monks came from the Scots Monastery, Regensburg and St. James's Abbey, Würzburg.

In 1418, the monastery was impoverished and in debt. The altar vessels were mortgaged, and the Scots Monastery, Regensburg no longer guaranteed the debt. The abbey was taken over by German Benedictines from Reichenbach After the take-over the monastery was partially rebuilt, and the church and chapels were renovated. The Irish monks had to come to terms with the new regime or leave the abbey.

At the Reformation in 1525 the monastery was dissolved, and the monastic estates transferred to the city authorities. After the Peace of Augsburg there were two unsuccessful attempts to recover the former monastic estates for the Benedictine order, firstly in 1578 by the Scottish Bishop John Lesley on behalf of Mary, Queen of Scots, and from 1629 to 1631 by a Commission for the Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg to implement a Roman Catholic Restitution Edict. On 6 and 7 July 1696 a fire destroyed the monastery and church.

The church was rebuilt in the baroque style. The foundation stone was laid on 14 October 1711. The architects were Johann Trost and Gottlieb Trost. It was the largest construction project in Nuremberg in the 18th century. The stucco decorations were done by Donato Polli. The frescos were painted by Daniel Preisler and Johann Martin Schuster.

The church was badly damaged during the Second World War in an air raid on 2 January 1945. The roof on the nave, crossing, transepts and choir collapsed and the outer walls were badly damaged. It was rebuilt between 1946 and 1959 by the Nuremberg architect Rudolf Gröschel in an economic interpretative way, as the costs to reconstruct the baroque interior with its ornate detail was unaffordable at the time.

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Details

Founded: 1711
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amali B (20 months ago)
Wonderful Church
BradJill (21 months ago)
St. Egidien is a Baroque church at Egidienplatz in Nuremburg. The church's history dates back to the early Middle Ages. However, the church you see today is a post WWII reconstruction of the early 18th-century building by Johann Trost and Gottlieb Trost. Sadly, during the 20th-century reconstructions, it was cost prohibitive to revive the churches previous ornate Baroque interior. Instead it seems a more subtle and economically feasible rebuild took place, resulting a rather simple interior that you see today in the form of an oval shaped nave with an appealing bronze crucifix at the main altar. The exterior is attractive, featuring two towers with clock faces, topped with crosses. These make for nice photos when you step back on the square a bit. Have a look-see of the church if you plan to pass through Egidienplatz during your visit to Nuremburg. It is worth 5-10 minutes of your time to see the inside.
Community Chris (2 years ago)
Nice historic site
Sang Bùi (2 years ago)
Beautyfull
Erjon Gjati (2 years ago)
Nice place
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