Attel Abbey was a monastery, originally of the Benedictines, later of the Brothers Hospitallers. The monastery, dedicated to Saint Mary the Virgin and Saint Michael was founded as a Benedictine abbey by Count Arnold of Diessen-Andechs in around 1037. It was dissolved in 1803 in the secularisation of Bavaria. The abbey buildings were partly demolished, partly acquired by private owners.

In 1874 the Bavarian government set up a home for disabled men in the remaining premises, the running of which they entrusted to the Order of the Brothers Hospitallers. Apart from the years of World War II, when under the National Socialist government the Brothers were obliged to close the home and leave, they remained here until 1970, when declining numbers forced them to give up Attel. The running of the home was taken over by the Charity Union of München-Freising until 1994, when it became independently managed.

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Attel 34, Attel, Germany
See all sites in Attel

Details

Founded: c. 1037
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

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en.wikipedia.org

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