Freising Cathedral

Freising, Germany

Freising Cathedral, also called Saint Mary and Corbinian Cathedral, is a romanesque basilica. An early church was present on the site by AD 715, consecrated as episcopal church by Boniface in 739. A triple nave was constructed in 860 and rebuilt after a fire in 903. The church was completely destroyed by fire on Palm Sunday, 5 April 1159. Construction of the current romanesque building started in 1159 and completed in 1205. The romanesque wooden ceiling was replaced by a gothic vault in 1481–3.

The tomb of St. Corbinian, the patron saint of the bishopric, is located in the four-nave crypt of the cathedral. In the centre of this crypt is the Bestiensäule ('pillar of beasts'), one of the most distinguished sculptures in Europe.

Substantial reconstruction was undertaken during the Baroque period, beginning in 1619. A complete renovation begun in 1621, and its nearly completed high altar was consecrated on 1 January 1624. In 1623, Prince-Bishop Veit Adam von Gebeck of Freising commissioned Hans Rottenhammer (1564-1625) to paint a vast altarpiece. Rottenhammer was near the end of his career (and life) and possibly an alcoholic, and his work was delayed. The commission was transferred to Rubens at an unknown time. Rubens completed the painting of the Woman of the Apocalypse, a subject that had been very popular in German iconography since the 15th century. The finished painting is first mentioned in 1632, when it was evacuated from the advancing Swedish troops. It is now kept in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich.

Another renovation was undertaken in 1724, in view of the church's thousand-year anniversary. The rococo decoration of the interior created is a work of Cosmas Damian Asam and Egid Quirin Asam. In the 1920s, some of the frescoes were painted over and severely damged. These were restored in 2006.

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Address

Domberg 36, Freising, Germany
See all sites in Freising

Details

Founded: 1159-1205
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Людмила Жустарева (3 months ago)
Honestly, one of the most beautiful cathedrals Ive ever seen - though the paintings, I guess, are not authentic but rather renewed, still they remain the look and spirit of old catholic churches in the best traditions of the Renaissance. In opposite to quite modest exterior, the interior is rich and gorgeous in terms of decorations. Worth visiting))
Juan Antonio Estrada Herrera (5 months ago)
It's a really beautiful Catedral from a really beautiful city nearby Munich. I love it and recommend it a 100%
Michael Volkmann (6 months ago)
Really interesting church with many things to explore, they even have public toilets!
Marcel Vanecek (7 months ago)
Wonderfull cathedral... You have to Visit it
Heiner Wutz (12 months ago)
Beautiful and full of history
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