Höglwörth Abbey

Höglwörth, Germany

Höglwörth Abbey is a former monastery of the Augustinian Canons, dedicated to St. Peter and Paul. It was founded in 1125 by Archbishop Conrad I of Salzburg. It was the only monastery saved from the secularization of Bavaria (1802 and 1803), until Rupertiwinkel became part of the Kingdom of Bavaria in 1816. The last provost Gilbert Grab sought relief from secularization from 1813, but this was not granted until 1816 by the King of Bavaria. On 30 July 1817 it was formally given independence as a privately owned monastery.

The monastery with its rococo church on a peninsula in Lake Höglwörth represents one of the finest ensembles in the eastern Upper Bavaria. The church was rebuilt from 1675. The choir was preserved from the Romanesque church. Before silting to the east the monastery was on an island, but it is now on a peninsula. Wörth is an old word for island, and it is still shown as an island on the field map from the 19th century.

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Details

Founded: 1125
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roman Kurian (16 months ago)
top!
J R (3 years ago)
Beautiful
Moni Obare (3 years ago)
Nice.
Ioja Cristian (3 years ago)
The church show how rich was Hallstad in medieval time.
Edward Goody (3 years ago)
The location is absolutely beautiful we recommend walking around lake through the forest and stopping by for a meal or just a cold drink at the Gasthaus located next to the Abby.
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