Salzburg Residenz

Salzburg, Austria

For centuries the Archbishops of Salzburg resided at the Salzburg Residenz and used the palace to present and represent their political status. Today the Salzburg Residenz palace is a museum and one of the most impressive attractions in the city.

The earliest recorded reference to the bishop's palace was in a document dated 1232. Construction began under Archbishop Konrad I. In the 16th century, several changes and additions to the structure were made. The bishop's palace took on its present appearance under the auspices of Wolf Dietrich von Raitenau (1587–1612). In the early 17th century, work began on the south wing, which included the addition of the large staircase and the Carabinieri-Saal, a section that connected the palace to the Franziskanerkirche and a large courtyard.

The successors of Wolf Dietrich continued to expand and refine the palace through to the end of the 18th century. Throughout the centuries, the palace served as the archbishops' residence, as well as a place of public gatherings and state affairs, all taking place in a setting that reflected power and grandeur.

Today, the Salzburg Residenz houses the Residenzgalerie, which presents paintings from the 16th to the 18th century, and Austrian paintings from the 19th century.

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Founded: 1596
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Scott Bayer (10 months ago)
Lovely Mozart concert
Yumi Jo (12 months ago)
Knowing about history is important for future
Shevan Silva (2 years ago)
Not allowed to take photos though I did anyway. So frustrating about most places in Austria where you're not allowed to take photos. Worth visiting though.
Samajaya Resources (2 years ago)
Nice art paintings on building
Cindy Candidus (2 years ago)
Museum, art gallery and church exhibit. I liked this over the castle
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