Münsterschwarzach Abbey

Münsterschwarzach, Germany

Münsterschwarzach Abbey, dedicated to the Holy Saviour, the Virgin Mary and Saint Felicity, was founded before 788 as a nunnery. It was a private foundation of the Carolingian ruling house: the abbesses were daughters of the imperial family, for example Theodrada (d. 853), a daughter of Charlemagne. After the death of the last Carolingian abbess, Bertha, in 877, the nuns left the abbey and it was taken over by Benedictines.

Münsterschwarzach became a centre of monastic reform during the 12th century, when Bishop Adalbero of Würzburg, who was in close contact with the reform movements of Cluny, Gorze and Hirsau, appointed Egbert of Gorze as abbot. Egbert not only reformed and renewed the spiritual life of Münsterschwarzach but then, through the spread of the subsequent Münsterschwarzach Reforms, exerted an influence far beyond it, from Harsefeld Archabbey near Stade in the north to Melk and Lambach in the south.

In the 18th century a Baroque basilica was commissioned from Balthasar Neumann, with frescoes in the cupolas by Holzer; it was dedicated in 1743 by Bishop Friedrich Karl von Schönborn.

In 1803 the abbey was dissolved in the course of the secularisation of Bavaria. The monastic buildings were auctioned off. In 1805 the abbey church was sold and deconsecrated. In 1810 the buildings were struck by lightning and severely damaged by the subsequent fire, and between 1821 and 1827 the remains of the church were entirely demolished, and those of the monastic buildings largely demolished.

In 1913 the remains of the old abbey were re-acquired by the Missionary Benedictines, along with the necessary land to support it. The first abbot after the restoration was Dom Placidus Vogel (1914-1937). He was followed by Dom Burkhard Utz (1937-1959) and Dom Bonifaz Vogel (1959-1982), a nephew of Abbot Placidus. The monumental abbey church with its four towers was built between 1935 and 1938, when it was dedicated. The architect was Albert Bosslet.

Between 1941 and 1945 the abbey was confiscated by the National Socialists and used as a military hospital. Although the monastic community had been expelled, some monks were able to remain as workers in the hospital. It reopened after the war.

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Details

Founded: 788 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sven Johannsen (19 months ago)
Das geistliche Zentrum im Bistum Würzburg. Es ist eine Stärkung des Glaubens am Stundengebet und der Liturgie teilzunehmen. In den letzten Jahren wurde auch um die Abtei herum viele neue Initiativen gestartet, z. B. Metzgerei und Bäckerei, aber auch die Umgestaltung der Buchhandlung. Es lohnt sich immer zurück zu kommen
chiyi hu (2 years ago)
It's a quiet place for retreat!!
Piotr Kuta (2 years ago)
A fantastic place. It’s a huge and impressive as far a visual aspect is considered. More important fact is the monks' prayer. We can take part in sung prayers a few times a day in a centuries old rhythm. They also offer opportunity for confession every day.
Dominik Viertel (2 years ago)
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Gerhard Mayer (2 years ago)
Interesting place... friendly shop.
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