Würzburg Residence

Würzburg, Germany

The sumptuous Würzburg Residence was built and decorated in the 18th century by an international corps of architects, painters, sculptors, and stucco workers under the patronage of two successive Prince-Bishops, Johann Philipp Franz and Friedrich Karl von Schönborn.

The Residence was essentially constructed between 1720 and 1744, decorated on the interior from 1740 to 1770 and landscaped with magnificent gardens from 1765 to 1780. It testifies to the ostentation of the two Prince-Bishops, and as such illustrates the historical situation of one of the most brilliant courts of Europe during the 18th century. The most renowned architects of the period - the Viennese, Lukas von Hildebrandt, and the Parisians Robert de Cotte and Germain Boffrand - drew up the plans. They were supervised by the official architect of the Prince Bishop, Balthasar Neumann, who was assisted by Maximilian von Welsch, the architect of the Elector of Mainz. Sculptors and stucco-workers came from Italy, Flanders, and Munich. The Venetian painter Giovanni Battista Tiepolo frescoed the staircase and the walls of the Imperial Hall.

As a result of a devastating air raid on March 16, 1945, the residence was almost completely burnt out and only the central building with the Vestibule, Garden Hall, Staircase, White Hall and Imperial Hall survived the inferno, their roofs destroyed. From the attic the fire ate down through wooden ceilings and floors, and all the furnishings and wall panelling which had not been stored elsewhere were devoured by the flames. Much of the furnishing and large sections of the wall panelling of the period rooms had been removed in time and thus escaped destruction. Neumann's stone vaults withstood the collapse of the burning attic. However, because the roofs had gone, further damage was incurred in the ensuing period due to dampness. In the Court Chapel, for example, most of the ceiling frescoes by Rudolph Byss succumbed to the subsequent consequences of the fire, in spite of the intact vault, and had to be laboriously reconstructed.

From 1945 to 1987, the building and its interiors were reconstructed to their current state. The residence gives consummate testimony to the imposing courtly and cultural life of the feudalistic era of the 18th century, but at the same time its varied use today is an example of modern utilisation and preservation as a monument of ahistorical structure.

The Würzburg Residence with its Court Gardens and Residence Square was inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1981.

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Details

Founded: 1720-1780
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dagmar Law (4 months ago)
It's a place you need to see! The architecture and interior is phenomenal. We have been to Versailles and I thought that Some of the rooms were grander than the French palace. Some rooms you are only able to enter if you are in a guided tour. You are also not allowed to take photos. But that was okay. The gardens must be really beautiful in summer.
Ben Makepeace (5 months ago)
Amazing views, wonderful architecture, and plenty of fascinating history. We thoroughly enjoyed our time visiting the location and exploring. Lots of great photos and memories. We would happily return and spend a day. Winter time was great for us.
Christian Herrington (5 months ago)
Such a beautiful building. The rooms inside are amazing and the grounds are as well. It is definitely worth going inside and taking the tour. Beautiful architecture and restoration.
Alejandro Sanchez (6 months ago)
Very beautiful place. The architecture is very nice. It is a museum and if you have the time to visit it, you will learn a lot of Wurzburg history. There is also a very ancient wine cellar which is worthy visiting. There are wine tasting tours and the wine quality is very good. There is a big parking lot structure.
Jen Moss (6 months ago)
Amazing! Absolutely beautiful inside and out. Its easy to see why this is a world heritage site. Admission is inexpensive and parking is pretty plentiful. At least stop by to wander the gardens but you're missing out if you don't check out the inside!
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