Donauwörth Abbey

Donauwörth, Germany

The Holy Cross Abbey in Donauwörth was founded around 1040 by Mangold I von Werd as a Benedictine convent. In the early 12th century the convent moved to the western edge of the city to the highest point insode the city walls. After buildings were damaged during the Thirty Years' War, the abbey church wa rebuilt. In 1770-1780 it was expanded to the Rococo style.

The monastery was dissolved in 1803. The church remained as a parish church. At the beginning of the fifth coalition war (1809) resided Napoléon Bonaparte for several days in the Prelature of the dissolved monastery. The 'Napoleon Room' still exists. In 1935 the Holy Cross Abbey returned to religious use.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: c. 1040
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

de.wikipedia.org

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Cháteau Comtal

The Château Comtal (Count’s Castle) is a medieval castle within the Cité of Carcassonne, the largest city in Europe with its city walls still intact. The Château Comtal has a strong claim to be called a 'Cathar Castle'. When the Catholic Crusader army arrived in 1209 they first attacked Raymond-Roger Trencavel's castrum at Bèziers and then moved on to his main stronghold at Carcassonne.

The castle with rectangular shape is separated from the city by a deep ditch and defended by two barbicans. There are six towers curtain walls.

The castle was restored in 1853 by the architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. It was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997.