St. Stephen's Abbey

Augsburg, Germany

St. Stephen's Abbey, dedicated to Saint Stephen, was founded in 969 by Saint Ulrich, Bishop of Augsburg, and used by Augustinian canonesses. It was dissolved in the secularisation of Bavaria in 1803, and the premises passed into the possession of the town. The army used the site for a few years as a quartermaster's store.

In 1828 King Ludwig I of Bavaria founded a grammar school here, as a successor to the former Jesuit college of St. Salvator (1582–1807). In 1835 he established the Benedictine monastery and entrusted it with the running of the school. The buildings were entirely destroyed in 1944 but have been re-built.

The monks continue to run the school and boarding house, and are engaged in pastoral and youth work.

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Details

Founded: 969 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sven Schätzl (10 months ago)
As usual Benedictine sober permitted. Appealing and dignified worship. Port of calm in the center of Augsburg.
Birgit Lempart (2 years ago)
Nice to look at
Thomas Binder (3 years ago)
An oasis in the middle of the city. The monastery, with its friendly and patient fathers and all employees, offers deceleration, peace and spiritual support. Seminars are offered here regularly or you can simply spend a few days in the monastery to gain peace and distance. You don't even have to be Catholic to take advantage of the offers ...
Tomáš Pisinger (3 years ago)
Amazing
Ein Nutzer (3 years ago)
Sehr beeindruckend
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