St. Stephen's Abbey

Augsburg, Germany

St. Stephen's Abbey, dedicated to Saint Stephen, was founded in 969 by Saint Ulrich, Bishop of Augsburg, and used by Augustinian canonesses. It was dissolved in the secularisation of Bavaria in 1803, and the premises passed into the possession of the town. The army used the site for a few years as a quartermaster's store.

In 1828 King Ludwig I of Bavaria founded a grammar school here, as a successor to the former Jesuit college of St. Salvator (1582–1807). In 1835 he established the Benedictine monastery and entrusted it with the running of the school. The buildings were entirely destroyed in 1944 but have been re-built.

The monks continue to run the school and boarding house, and are engaged in pastoral and youth work.

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Details

Founded: 969 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ein Nutzer (17 months ago)
Sehr beeindruckend
arjuna gallus (17 months ago)
P. Michael Gebhart OSB (2 years ago)
Benediktiner in der Stadt mit Kirche, Gästehaus und Gymnasium
Tom Humphreys (2 years ago)
pretty grounds and gardens
Wolfgang Binswanger Fa.BinHa (2 years ago)
Hatte dieses Wochenende an einem für mich unvergesslichen und wertvollen Seminar teilgenommen im Kloster. Fazit für mich, das Team um Pater Theodor hatte alles bis ins Detail bestens organisiert und für mich ein unvergessliches Wochenende im Kloster geboten. Ich kann das Benediktinerkloster nur weiter empfehlen um zum Beispiel mal Abstand zu gewinnen vom Alltag oder einer anderen belastbaren Sache. Deshalb volle Punktzahl von mir.
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