Weissenstein Palace

Pommersfelden, Germany

Schloss Weißenstein is palatial residence in Pommersfelden, considered a masterwork of Baroque art. In 1710, Lothar Franz von Schönborn, Prince-Bishop of Bamberg and Archbishop of Mainz, inherited the estate after the local family, the Truchsesse of Pommersfelden had died out. He ordered the construction of a palace as a private summer residence, paid for from his personal wealth. A team or architects including Johann Dientzenhofer, who had previously built the Fulda Cathedral, and Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt, the court architect of the Austrian Emperor Karl VI. The Marstall and park were designed by Schönborn's own court architect, Maximilian von Welsch.

The castle was built between 1711 and 1719 from local sandstone materials. The interior art was finished in 1723. After the death of Lothar Franz in 1729, the palace passed to his nephew Friedrich Karl von Schönborn who had the park expanded. A plan by Balthasar Neumann was however, only partially realized. In the early 19th century, the park was transformed from its original Baroque form into an English landscape garden.

During the Seven Years' War the palace was attacked and damaged by Prussian troops. Minor restoration work was done in the late 19th century. More recently, preservation work has been done in 1975 to 2003.

Today Weißenstein remains the property of the Schönborn family. It is considered a Baroque masterwork and the combination of exterior and well-preserved interiors gives it European importance. The palace and its park are open to the public.

The palace contains the largest private Baroque art collection in Germany, containing over 600 pictures. Baroque and Renaissance artists represented include Peter Paul Rubens, Albrecht Dürer, Titian, Rembrandt and Anthony van Dyck.

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Details

Founded: 1711-1719
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dave Pearson (4 months ago)
Lovely old stately home, we did not go inside even though that is possible. at the time of visiting the cafe and toilettes were open to the public and one could walk in the grounds of the park, this is not a park with ornate garden features but a large park with a lake and grasses were deer can roam. There is ample free parking and covid restrictions were applied at the time of our visit.
Jose Mendoza (12 months ago)
Great wedding location.
David Holler (13 months ago)
Cool
Vaidas Černiauskas (13 months ago)
Super!
Goran Markovic (14 months ago)
Interesting castle, especially the interior. However there are only few rooms open for the public and it is a bit expensive for such small toor. They even charge additionally for the garden that is nothing special.
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