St. Sebaldus Church

Nuremberg, Germany

St. Sebaldus Church is one of the most important and oldest churches of Nuremberg. It takes its name from Sebaldus, an 8th-century hermit and missionary and patron saint of Nuremberg. It has been a Lutheran parish church since the Reformation.

The construction of the building began in 1225. the church achieved parish church status in 1255 and was completed by 1273-75. It was originally built as a Romanesque basilica with two choirs. During the 14th century several important changes to the construction were made: first the side aisles were widened and the steeples made higher (1309–1345), then the late gothic hall chancel was built (1358–1379). The two towers were added in the 15th century. In the middle 17th century galleries were added and the interior was remodelled in the Baroque fashion. The church suffered serious damage during World War II and was subsequently restored. Some of the old interior undamaged includes the Shrine of St. Sebaldus, works by Veit Stoss and the stained glass windows.

The church had an organ by the 14th century, and another by the 15th. The main organ had been built in 1440–41 by Heinrich Traxdorf, who also built two small organs for Nuremberg's Frauenkirche. Until its destruction in the 20th century it was one of the oldest playable organs in the world. The Traxdorf organ was rebuilt in 1691. The modified case was destroyed by the Allied forces during a bombing raid on 2 January 1945.

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Details

Founded: 1225
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Udo J Eppinger (9 months ago)
Attended very inspiring service there 2day
Studio Thirty (11 months ago)
Great church to visit
Thomas Bergendorff (12 months ago)
Fantastic, beautiful church. Very impressive, outside as well as inside....
Tarasov Cătălina-Ecaterina (13 months ago)
A quiet place where I got to know the local art, religious traditions. I enjoyed architecture of this significant building, located just in the heart of the city.
Benedict Uy (16 months ago)
The entrance of the church is facing away from the main road. We stopped by a place for lunch nearby and I had a quick look at the front of the church. It has a really nice crucifix out front. There are also two bell towers with doors under each. I didn't have time to have a look inside but the outside was quite nice. The back of it was also interesting with a carving that is visible from the main road.
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