St. Sebaldus Church

Nuremberg, Germany

St. Sebaldus Church is one of the most important and oldest churches of Nuremberg. It takes its name from Sebaldus, an 8th-century hermit and missionary and patron saint of Nuremberg. It has been a Lutheran parish church since the Reformation.

The construction of the building began in 1225. the church achieved parish church status in 1255 and was completed by 1273-75. It was originally built as a Romanesque basilica with two choirs. During the 14th century several important changes to the construction were made: first the side aisles were widened and the steeples made higher (1309–1345), then the late gothic hall chancel was built (1358–1379). The two towers were added in the 15th century. In the middle 17th century galleries were added and the interior was remodelled in the Baroque fashion. The church suffered serious damage during World War II and was subsequently restored. Some of the old interior undamaged includes the Shrine of St. Sebaldus, works by Veit Stoss and the stained glass windows.

The church had an organ by the 14th century, and another by the 15th. The main organ had been built in 1440–41 by Heinrich Traxdorf, who also built two small organs for Nuremberg's Frauenkirche. Until its destruction in the 20th century it was one of the oldest playable organs in the world. The Traxdorf organ was rebuilt in 1691. The modified case was destroyed by the Allied forces during a bombing raid on 2 January 1945.

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Details

Founded: 1225
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anton Michel (31 days ago)
Very nice church, free admission.
Ashish Gahlot (2 months ago)
Great place with some amazing architecture
z k (2 months ago)
From an inside visit POV, this church is vastly superior to the one in the square (though that one is worth an outside visit at least). You get such a sense of the vastness of the space with the vaulted ceilings, the windows, and the massive pipe organ. The artwork everywhere is incredible. It is truly awe inspiring, worth every moment you choose to spend here. I got lucky and came back after it was "officially" closed, in time to hear someone practicing on the organ. What a treat! Don't know if it's a regular occurrence. This place is a great visit either way; try to work it in as you cross the city center from one attraction to the next!
frans zondervan (4 months ago)
A beautiful church that was well restored after WW2.
Chris Smith (10 months ago)
Was a small fee to enter, absolutely gorgeous architecture and I will be updating with pictures later. I have pictures of something that no one else captured and I think it should be displayed and posted more. Don’t miss out and visit now!
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