St. Sebaldus Church

Nuremberg, Germany

St. Sebaldus Church is one of the most important and oldest churches of Nuremberg. It takes its name from Sebaldus, an 8th-century hermit and missionary and patron saint of Nuremberg. It has been a Lutheran parish church since the Reformation.

The construction of the building began in 1225. the church achieved parish church status in 1255 and was completed by 1273-75. It was originally built as a Romanesque basilica with two choirs. During the 14th century several important changes to the construction were made: first the side aisles were widened and the steeples made higher (1309–1345), then the late gothic hall chancel was built (1358–1379). The two towers were added in the 15th century. In the middle 17th century galleries were added and the interior was remodelled in the Baroque fashion. The church suffered serious damage during World War II and was subsequently restored. Some of the old interior undamaged includes the Shrine of St. Sebaldus, works by Veit Stoss and the stained glass windows.

The church had an organ by the 14th century, and another by the 15th. The main organ had been built in 1440–41 by Heinrich Traxdorf, who also built two small organs for Nuremberg's Frauenkirche. Until its destruction in the 20th century it was one of the oldest playable organs in the world. The Traxdorf organ was rebuilt in 1691. The modified case was destroyed by the Allied forces during a bombing raid on 2 January 1945.

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Details

Founded: 1225
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joerg (13 months ago)
One of the iconic historical monuments in Nuernberg.
Nikolay Vasilev (13 months ago)
If you're visiting Nürnberg, you should definitely pay this church a visit!
Justin Hardesty (2 years ago)
A beautiful area with beautiful architecture you visit with friends or family.
Julien Piccini (2 years ago)
Nice Cathedral, a bit dark. So best pictures are at night or sunny morning.
Thomas Owen (2 years ago)
Probably the most impressive of Nürnberg's (many) churches. The short video display showing the evolution of the building is worth seeing. A lovely range of art and sculpture from different periods.
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