Lednice–Valtice Cultural Landscape

Lednice, Czech Republic

Between the 17th and 20th centuries, the ruling dukes of Liechtenstein transformed their domains in southern Moravia into a striking landscape. It married Baroque architecture (mainly the work of Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach) and the classical and neo-Gothic style of the castles of Lednice and Valtice with countryside fashioned according to English romantic principles of landscape architecture. At 200 km2, it is one of the largest artificial landscapes in Europe and therefore a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The House of Liechtenstein acquired a castle in Lednice in 1249, which marked the beginning of their settlement in the area. It remained the principal Liechtenstein residence for 700 years, until 1939 and World War II.

The Dukes of Liechtenstein transformed their properties into one large and designed private park between the 17th and 20th centuries. During the 19th century, the Dukes continued transforming the area as a large traditional English landscape park. The Baroque and Gothic Revival style architecture of their chateaux are married with smaller buildings and a landscape that was fashioned according to the English principles of landscape architecture.

In 1715 these two chateaux were connected by a landscape alée and road, later renamed for the poet Petr Bezruč. The Lednice Ponds are situated between the villages of Valtice, Lednice, and Hlohovec. A substantial part of the cultural landscape complex is covered in pine forests and in areas adjacent to the River Dyje with riparian forests.

In the 20th century the region became part of new Czechoslovakia The Liechtenstein family opposed the annexation of Czech territory in the fascist Sudetenland by Nazi Germany, and as a consequence their properties were confiscated by the Nazis, and the family then relocated to Vaduz in 1939. After World War II the family made several legal attempts for restitution of the properties. However, they had passed post-war into ownership by the new Soviet Czechoslovakia. Of course its Communist government did not support returning large estates to exiled aristocratic landowners.

After the Czechoslovakian Velvet Revolution in 1992, the Liechtenstein descendants again renewed legal attempts for restitution, which were denied by the Czech state, the present day owner of the properties.

The principal elements are Chateau Valtice, Chateau Lednice and the village of Hlohovec.

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Address

422, Lednice, Czech Republic
See all sites in Lednice

Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Catalina Suzana Tanasescu (2 months ago)
I recommend looking for the connection with the historical train, it is a lovely experience!
Tadej Mayer (3 months ago)
The castle itself is not so impressive for me. It's a bit basic neo baroque building and having to pay 4 different tickets for 1000czk altogether seems excessive. If you have to choose I would go with the representation rooms. They were the most impressive for me with some very nice wood carvings. The surrounding garden is very nice to a long walk. All in all it's a nice option for a day trip. Fun fact the castle posseses the largest faux deer head collection I have ever seen.
jason Peterson (7 months ago)
Wendy was our guide and she did an outstanding job. Really great stop if you want to know more about Czech history.
J K (8 months ago)
A wonderful place for a longer walk. The palace and surroundings are impressive. Here you need to stop longer and walk around the gardens and around the lake.
Rudi Dietze (9 months ago)
These are by far very impressive backdrops around these castles of the high nobility of Liechtenstein. Highly recommended with the necessary peace and time for absolute grace, beauty and aesthetics. The orangery with its numerous plants is impressive... The next time will certainly be exciting!
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