Lednice–Valtice Cultural Landscape

Lednice, Czech Republic

Between the 17th and 20th centuries, the ruling dukes of Liechtenstein transformed their domains in southern Moravia into a striking landscape. It married Baroque architecture (mainly the work of Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach) and the classical and neo-Gothic style of the castles of Lednice and Valtice with countryside fashioned according to English romantic principles of landscape architecture. At 200 km2, it is one of the largest artificial landscapes in Europe and therefore a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The House of Liechtenstein acquired a castle in Lednice in 1249, which marked the beginning of their settlement in the area. It remained the principal Liechtenstein residence for 700 years, until 1939 and World War II.

The Dukes of Liechtenstein transformed their properties into one large and designed private park between the 17th and 20th centuries. During the 19th century, the Dukes continued transforming the area as a large traditional English landscape park. The Baroque and Gothic Revival style architecture of their chateaux are married with smaller buildings and a landscape that was fashioned according to the English principles of landscape architecture.

In 1715 these two chateaux were connected by a landscape alée and road, later renamed for the poet Petr Bezruč. The Lednice Ponds are situated between the villages of Valtice, Lednice, and Hlohovec. A substantial part of the cultural landscape complex is covered in pine forests and in areas adjacent to the River Dyje with riparian forests.

In the 20th century the region became part of new Czechoslovakia The Liechtenstein family opposed the annexation of Czech territory in the fascist Sudetenland by Nazi Germany, and as a consequence their properties were confiscated by the Nazis, and the family then relocated to Vaduz in 1939. After World War II the family made several legal attempts for restitution of the properties. However, they had passed post-war into ownership by the new Soviet Czechoslovakia. Of course its Communist government did not support returning large estates to exiled aristocratic landowners.

After the Czechoslovakian Velvet Revolution in 1992, the Liechtenstein descendants again renewed legal attempts for restitution, which were denied by the Czech state, the present day owner of the properties.

The principal elements are Chateau Valtice, Chateau Lednice and the village of Hlohovec.

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Address

422, Lednice, Czech Republic
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Founded: 17th century
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Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lisa Mcclease-Kelly (2 months ago)
We got there after it closed, but just the grounds were beautiful! I would love to see this place in Spring or Fall as well. Lots of families walking around enjoying the gardens.
Luboš Bury (2 months ago)
Beautiful historical place. Great for walks in every season. Just some buildings in the park could be renovated.
Marcin Sz (6 months ago)
Phantastic place for tour. You have be there and check it. It is a pity that only Czech tour guide was available. But in high seasons there are available English or German speaking tours . Nevertheless you will get at least room description on paper or some kind of brochures so you will get basic information about each room
Bipin Mehrotra (6 months ago)
Excellent place to visit... The castle is wonderful... But the gardens and landscapes are really of the top mark. The gardens, lakes, the foliage are too well cut and maintained of the highest quality. Really its mind boggling... Never miss Lendice .... Visit... It... One of the best gardens ever you have come across.
Stephen Nosalik (7 months ago)
The ground at Lednice are outstanding and well worth a visit. They are huge and wonderful to explore. With a ticket you can explore the chateau which I did not do finding it more than adequate to just explore the grounds on my own.
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