The former Governor's Palace in Brno offers a permanent exhibition of art from the gothic period to the 19th century which includes the Drawing and Graphic Cabinet and spaces for temporary exhibitions. The Governor’s Palace also contains a baroque hall with a capacity of 150 seats which is used for a variety of events and exhibitions.

The permanent exhibition presents the most precious works of European art in the Moravian Gallery collections from the 14th to the 19th centuries, complemented by items on loan from religious institutions and other art collections. The individual sections consist of medieval art, baroque works by Moravian and Austrian painters and sculptors, a collection of Italian, Flemish and Dutch art recently enhanced by major new acquisitions, and figurative and landscape art of the 19th century.

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Address

Husova 18, Brno, Czech Republic
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Category: Museums in Czech Republic

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ch Ra (2 years ago)
Nice and clean place
jan subrt (3 years ago)
Awesome place - am a regular there. Great service excellent location and unique homemade cuisine (incl. Vegan).
Michal Sadílek (3 years ago)
Very nice and perfect music from group CIMBALIKA
Anna Gordeeva (3 years ago)
Great place in the city centre, not only the museum, but also a caffe with the possibility to sit in the yard
Daniel Hall (3 years ago)
This gallery is free for the permanent exhibitions. There is a really impressive collection of Flemish paintings here, which I enjoyed a lot (and I am not a big art lover). There could be a bit more English language description, and some of it is very poorly written. One major problem; security wanted to stop my wife from bringing hiking sticks in (she has a serious knee injury). On top of that, they were very sarcastic with her (she speaks fluent Czech). This is a problem, and needs to be addressed.
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