A. Le Coq Beer Museum

Tartu, Estonia

Tartu is the birthplace of Estonian beer industry and has been a beer town for nearly a thousand years. In order to perpetuate the history of industrial brewing, the Beer Museum was opened on July 1, 2003. The Beer Museum is located on the territory of A. Le Coq in a malt tower, built in 1898. The museum is located on six floors and the total number of exhibits amounts to approximately 2000. The exhibition explains brewing traditions worldwide and in Estonia, starting from the ancient Egyptian beer culture until the present times. You can see both, the homebrew making tools and old industrial beer equipment.

Naturally, the museum also includes beer corks, bottles, jars and barrels. The museum exhibits speak of the students’ beer-drinking traditions; we have also displayed the prizes and awards from various global exhibitions. All museum visits are concluded in the museum pub, where the visitors have a chance to taste drinks produced by A. Le Coq. Upon special request, tours can be arranged to the production facilities.

Reference: A. Le Coq Brewery

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 2003
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: New Independency (Estonia)

More Information

www.alecoq.ee

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Veiko Heinalo (4 months ago)
More beer shop,good.
Раиса Кирюхина (4 months ago)
Прекрасный музей, отличный гид, отвечал на все появившиеся вопросы. В конце экскурсии дегустация - опять же гид посоветовал, что можно выбрать. И хороший магазин сувениров при музее.
Ari Salakka (6 months ago)
KOKEMISEN ARVOINEN PAIKKA JA LOPUKSI MAISTIAISET !!!
Kristine Jasulovica (8 months ago)
Very interesting and exciting place
Siim Läänelaid (9 months ago)
Unique facility, good tour.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Dunluce Castle

Dunluce Castle is a ruined medieval castle located on the edge of a basalt outcropping in County Antrim, and is accessible via a bridge connecting it to the mainland. The castle is surrounded by extremely steep drops on either side, which may have been an important factor to the early Christians and Vikings who were drawn to this place where an early Irish fort once stood.

In the 13th century, Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, built the first castle at Dunluce. The earliest features of the castle are two large drum towers about 9 metres in diameter on the eastern side, both relics of a stronghold built here by the McQuillans after they became lords of the Route.

The McQuillans were the Lords of Route from the late 13th century until they were displaced by the MacDonnell after losing two major battles against them during the mid- and late-16th century.

Later Dunluce Castle became the home of the chief of the Clan MacDonnell of Antrim and the Clan MacDonald of Dunnyveg from Scotland.

In 1588 the Girona, a galleass from the Spanish Armada, was wrecked in a storm on the rocks nearby. The cannons from the ship were installed in the gatehouses and the rest of the cargo sold, the funds being used to restore the castle.

Dunluce Castle served as the seat of the Earl of Antrim until the impoverishment of the MacDonnells in 1690, following the Battle of the Boyne. Since that time, the castle has deteriorated and parts were scavenged to serve as materials for nearby buildings.