The first mention of Sangaste Manor date back to the year 1522. The present main building is one of the most gorgeous manor houses in Estonia. The red-brick house, built between 1879-1883, represents the Gothic revival style with English features. It was designed by architect Otto Pius Hippius and the owner of the building throughout its existence as a private house was the scientist Count Magnus von Berg (1845-1938).

There is a park of 75 hectacres surrounding the manor. Today, the castle is a visiting center and serves as the place for wedding ceremonies and welcomes all romantic souls.

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Address

Lossiküla, Sangaste, Estonia
See all sites in Sangaste

Details

Founded: 1879-1883
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kermo (5 months ago)
Beautiful. Check before going if it is open or else there is not that much to do.
Willian Fernandes (6 months ago)
Beautiful place with a long history about it, everything there is also in English and Estonian. You should try the whisper trick at front door. Go to opposite directions with a friend and whisper at wall, your other friend can listen to it! (Like the picture)
Uku Savi (6 months ago)
Very cool and beautiful. Would recommend
Andrus Piil (13 months ago)
wery beatiful ?
Vaida Juzenaite (16 months ago)
Nice place. But would be nice to visit after some years when be finish with reconstruction
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