The first mention of Sangaste Manor date back to the year 1522. The present main building is one of the most gorgeous manor houses in Estonia. The red-brick house, built between 1879-1883, represents the Gothic revival style with English features. It was designed by architect Otto Pius Hippius and the owner of the building throughout its existence as a private house was the scientist Count Magnus von Berg (1845-1938).

There is a park of 75 hectacres surrounding the manor. Today, the castle is a visiting center and serves as the place for wedding ceremonies and welcomes all romantic souls.

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Address

Lossiküla, Sangaste, Estonia
See all sites in Sangaste

Details

Founded: 1879-1883
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Barbora Cvečková (2 years ago)
Great place
George On tour (2 years ago)
Sangaste Castle and manor park are one of the most outstanding examples of historicism in the Baltic States. The most remarkable features of the castle are its gothic-style foyer, magnificent party halls and English-style hunting hall. An interesting acoustic effect is achieved with the arched pillars by the entrance: anything whispered in one corner can be clearly heard in the opposite corner. The castle was designed by architect Otto Pius Hippius, who was inspired by the famous Windsor Castle in England. It originally had 99 rooms – because only the tsar could have 100 or more rooms.
kenneth tuisk (2 years ago)
Amazing place with alot rooms. Also there is ticket to go inside. But its worth it cause its amazing castle and you can even go up to the tower and see all rooms. But you can see it outside for free, also in the backside you can go downstairs and theres a room too.
Malunguinho Da Silva (2 years ago)
Best place to have the best venue. Food was excellent, the surroundings are stunning and staff speaks English. The only trouble was to get there has is quite off road although the road is fairly good.
Jesper Bexkens (2 years ago)
This place has a lot of potential but does not live up to it. The park is okay, but could do better with more intensive gardening. The inside of the manor is the biggest disappointment. Hardly anything is on display there. It would be interesting to see how people have lived there at the turn of the 20th century. Now it is all very empty...
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