Royaumont Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey built between 1228 and 1235 with the support of Louis IX. Several members of the French Royal family were buried here (instead of Saint Denis Basilica), for example, three children and two grandchildren of Louis IX.

The abbey was dissolved in 1791 during the French Revolution and the stones were partly used to build a factory. However, the sacristy, cloister, and refectory remained intact.

In 1836 and 1838, respectively, two operas by German composer Friedrich von Flotow opened at Royaumont—Sérafine and Le Comte de Saint-Mégrin.

In the early 20th century, the abbey was bought by the Goüin family who in 1964 created the Royaumont Foundation, the first private French cultural foundation. Today, the abbey is a tourist attraction and also serves as a cultural centre.

From January 1915 to March 1919 the Abbey was turned into a voluntary hospital, operated by Scottish Women's Hospitals, under the direction of the French Red Cross. It was especially noted for its performance treating soldiers involved in the Battle of the Somme.

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Details

Founded: 1228-1235
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Xavier Gréhant (17 months ago)
Incredible place and service
Veselin Lazovic (17 months ago)
Totally magical place. It's a training centre for various companies, so it's not easy to get there. Very interesting history.
Tim Bestwick (17 months ago)
Fabulous facility for business meeting, great food, hosts could not do enough to help.
Salim Naji (18 months ago)
nice place to visit 14 km from Chantilly
Lambert Swillens (2 years ago)
Great place for seminars. Excellent rooms. One minor issue: poor mobile coverage.
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