Świny Castle, formerly a gord, as a stronghold existed in its location already in the 5th century - securing the Lubawecki mountain pass, the site was recorded in Cosmas' documents from 1108, where the gord is recorded as Suini in Poloniae. Possibly, soon after, the gord had been expanded into a military stronghold, at which time it was the seat of the castellans. The castle was mentioned in Pope Adrian IV's Papal bull. After the Bolków Castle was constructed, the castle began to lose its significance, this continued up to the nineteenth century, when the castle suffered severe damage due to hurricanes (1762, 1840, 1848, and 1868). The castle suffered further devastation - it was not until 1931 when the authorities had engaged in securing the castle's ruins. Currently the castle is privately owned.

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Founded: 1108
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Krystian Gramza (15 months ago)
Cool place to visit as well the local surroundings like church and rocks.
Paweł Maksymiuk (17 months ago)
Place is closed for public so you can't go inside. Only around is a small path thanks to which we can walk along the castle walls.
Katarzyna Kretowicz (20 months ago)
B)
Владимир Ипатьев (2 years ago)
Very good!!!
Morris Laflamme (2 years ago)
Great place to visit. Peaceful.
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