Bítov Castle is located on a steep promotory towering above the meandering River Želetavka. Built in the 11th century, Bítov is one of the oldest and largest Moravian castles.

A Přemyslid fortified settlement originally stood on the site and included the Chapel of Our Lady. The fort was rebuilt in the first half of the 13th century as an impregnable Gothic castle guarding the southern boundaries of the Přemyslid lands. In the 14th century a new inner ward was built along with Late Gothic fortifications. The Lords of Bítov became the new owners of the castle and based themselves here for four centuries. They carried out further improvements to the defensive capabilities of the castle.

Bítov finally underwent Baroque remodelling, and gained its present form at the beginning of the 19th century, when it passed into the hands of the Counts of Daun. The descendants of Marshal Daun, the famous military leader, rebuilt the castle in the spirit of the Romantic style. Between 1811 and 1845 the richly-decorated state rooms were created, on the basis of proposals of Anton Schuler. The culmination of the re-Gothicising work was the remodelling of the Church of the Assumption of the Virgin by Viennense architect Anton Rucker, who left the original Gothic furnishings. At the end of the 20th century, Bítov underwent extensive refurbishment.

The structural arrangement of the castle through remodelling, which was carried out several times later on, is an example of the Czech Early Gothic castle architecture. The arrangement is highly intricate and leads in one direction towards the front moat, to which both the wedge-shaped round towers pointed. The outer tower, above the moat, was later merged with the body of the castle, while the other tower stands alone at the rear of the inner court.

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Bítov, Czech Republic
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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

saska aaltonen (2 years ago)
Beautiful Place and nice nature and Animals. Kids loved The ostrich, Horse, Bulls and ducks.
Segolene Claudel (2 years ago)
Simply the best castle n saw in czech republic. Absolutely bucolic and soothing.
Kali Draco (2 years ago)
Armory is only open until Friday, but the castle is beautiful. Pity the guided tour doesn't allow a lot of time for really admiring the stuffed animal exposition.
Lubomir Kobeda (2 years ago)
Very nice castle, you can choose one of 4 types of ticket, based on your preferencies.
Droubek (2 years ago)
This would be one of the most interesting castles in the the country with very nice and interesting interiors and beautiful exterior. Recommended for any one interested in history.
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