Bítov Castle is located on a steep promotory towering above the meandering River Želetavka. Built in the 11th century, Bítov is one of the oldest and largest Moravian castles.

A Přemyslid fortified settlement originally stood on the site and included the Chapel of Our Lady. The fort was rebuilt in the first half of the 13th century as an impregnable Gothic castle guarding the southern boundaries of the Přemyslid lands. In the 14th century a new inner ward was built along with Late Gothic fortifications. The Lords of Bítov became the new owners of the castle and based themselves here for four centuries. They carried out further improvements to the defensive capabilities of the castle.

Bítov finally underwent Baroque remodelling, and gained its present form at the beginning of the 19th century, when it passed into the hands of the Counts of Daun. The descendants of Marshal Daun, the famous military leader, rebuilt the castle in the spirit of the Romantic style. Between 1811 and 1845 the richly-decorated state rooms were created, on the basis of proposals of Anton Schuler. The culmination of the re-Gothicising work was the remodelling of the Church of the Assumption of the Virgin by Viennense architect Anton Rucker, who left the original Gothic furnishings. At the end of the 20th century, Bítov underwent extensive refurbishment.

The structural arrangement of the castle through remodelling, which was carried out several times later on, is an example of the Czech Early Gothic castle architecture. The arrangement is highly intricate and leads in one direction towards the front moat, to which both the wedge-shaped round towers pointed. The outer tower, above the moat, was later merged with the body of the castle, while the other tower stands alone at the rear of the inner court.

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Bítov, Czech Republic
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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

cz Kadlec (10 months ago)
WELCOME TO THE GULAG EARN YOUR FREEDOM
David Lupau (11 months ago)
Beautiful castle in a stunning area. The staff is really nice, prices are ok, there is a restaurant inside where you can eat or just take a coffee and it is a dog friendly place.
John de Vrieze (2 years ago)
A beautiful castle on mountain at a amazing place
Rado Radimir (2 years ago)
Nice place, many things to see. Beautiful nature.Thumbs up.
Hadrian Augustyn (2 years ago)
The juggling event (today was at 16:00) where kids were invited to try their skills was great. It was as much fun for the adults as for the kids (if only you understand Czech language). The castle is tiny, but cute. Don't skip the garden (included in the "small" ticket 50CZK).
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