St. Procopius Basilica

Třebíč, Czech Republic

St. Procopius Basilica is a Romanesque-Gothic Christian church in Třebíč. The history of the basilica is closely associated with the history of the former Benedictine monastery. Before the basilica was constructed there was a chapel of St. Procopius, which was built in the year 1104 and was consecrated by Heřman, Bishop of Prague. Five years later, the monastery already had its own church. This was consecrated in year 1109 by then Bishop of Prague, Jan II. In the crypt of the church Duke Litold Znojemský was buried, one of the founders of the monastery, and three years later his brother and Duke Oldřich Brněnský, the second founder of the monastery, was likewise interred.

The monastery grew rich and its influence swelled. For about half of the 13th century the monastery was rebuilt and fortified. This reconstruction was started in about the year 1240 and finished in the year 1260. The reconstruction meant the disappearance of romanesque architecture in the monastery, but allowed for the new basilica to be built. The basilica is preserved in its original style to this day.

The basilica together with the Jewish Quarter in Třebíč were inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003.

The basilica was originally dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. Saint Procopius became the Patron saint of the basilica on the quincentenary his canonization in 1704. Jan Karel, Count of Valdštejn established a castle chapel of St. Procopius from the presbytery of the basilica.

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Details

Founded: 1240-1260
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petr O (19 months ago)
I love this place! It is one of the most beautiful place I've ever seen. It should be on your must-see list.
Tutorial and BassTest (19 months ago)
Good
Victor Cheng (2 years ago)
Ok
Cameron Lindsay (3 years ago)
Very large gothic cathedral. Worth doing the guided tour even though it is in Czech.
Anna Aglietti (3 years ago)
A mixture or romanesque and gothic architecture dating from the early 13th century - not common at all in the Czech Republic. Please mind that the interior is only accessible with a guided tour (check the timings, we got there 9 minutes late and were not allowed in, not even for a quick glance). A view and a lovely herb garden (with name-tags for herbs!) makes up for the disappointment if you don't manage to get in.
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