St. Procopius Basilica

Třebíč, Czech Republic

St. Procopius Basilica is a Romanesque-Gothic Christian church in Třebíč. The history of the basilica is closely associated with the history of the former Benedictine monastery. Before the basilica was constructed there was a chapel of St. Procopius, which was built in the year 1104 and was consecrated by Heřman, Bishop of Prague. Five years later, the monastery already had its own church. This was consecrated in year 1109 by then Bishop of Prague, Jan II. In the crypt of the church Duke Litold Znojemský was buried, one of the founders of the monastery, and three years later his brother and Duke Oldřich Brněnský, the second founder of the monastery, was likewise interred.

The monastery grew rich and its influence swelled. For about half of the 13th century the monastery was rebuilt and fortified. This reconstruction was started in about the year 1240 and finished in the year 1260. The reconstruction meant the disappearance of romanesque architecture in the monastery, but allowed for the new basilica to be built. The basilica is preserved in its original style to this day.

The basilica together with the Jewish Quarter in Třebíč were inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003.

The basilica was originally dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. Saint Procopius became the Patron saint of the basilica on the quincentenary his canonization in 1704. Jan Karel, Count of Valdštejn established a castle chapel of St. Procopius from the presbytery of the basilica.

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Founded: 1240-1260
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Miroslav Sklar (10 months ago)
Built in 1260 Anno Dominik.
Jiří Chromý (2 years ago)
My home town Třebíč. Unique basilica (UNESCO). Jewish old Town, Jewish cemetery.
Tom Dubois (2 years ago)
Brilliant guided tour of this stunning basilica.
Geoffrey Pottinger (2 years ago)
On my 1st visit to Czechia and friends in the region, I was intrigued by the significant historic value and legends unearthed at this Basilica in the village of Trebic. There are architectural styles from three very distinctive eras in art history that influenced the design of the structures as the actual construction progressed from start to completion. There are some exceptionally preserved frescoes that adorns the walls inside the small chapel that seemingly celebrates cultural ideology more that religious orthodoxy, and the tales surrounding their revelation inspire greater intrigue in the folklore of this UNESCO Heritage site. The crypt in the cavern below retains that somber energy, but finds stark contrasts in the fact that part of a column was removed at one point to allow barrels of beer to be stored because of its cool cellar temp. and this magnificent basillica spent years as a common brewery before the historical value was finally revealed, it's original purpose restored then then ultimately honored as it should, all of this makes it a phenomenal site to behold and revere.
Gabriela Sládková (2 years ago)
Unique place on its own, but there's also a beautiful herb garden outside and a great view of the city. The guided tour of the interior was informative and interesting. It also allows access to most of the spaces inside the building, which give you insight into various eras of the building's existence. If you're interested in history or architecture, I can't recommend it enough. Photos are allowed inside the building.
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