St. Maurice Church is one the most precious buildings of the late Gothic style in Moravia. The three-naved structure has a cross vaulting dating from the middle of the 14th century. A more advanced net vault may be seen in the presbytery.

Two asymmetric prismatic towers were built on the western facade. In the western part of the church there is a unique double spiral staircase.

The real gem is the late Gothic sculpture of the 15th century, Christ on the Mount of Olives, located in the interior.

On the northern wall of the church, there is the Renaissance burial chapel of the Edelmann family. After a fire in 1709, the interior was redecorated in the Baroque style; Loretta Chapel and All Souls Chapel were added. Painters Jan Kryštof Handke, Karel Josef Haringer and Karel Moravec and sculptors Filip Sattler, Jan Sturmer and Jiří Antonín Heinz took part in the Baroque adaptations of the interior.

Maurice‘s organ, the largest organ in Central Europe and the eighth largest in Europe, were made by Master Michael Engler in 1745. It was decorated by the sculptor Philip Sattler and the wood-carver Jan Jiří Huckh. The original Baroque instrument with three keyboards underwent a renovation in the sixties of the 20th century.At that time a modern instrument was added, with 5 keyboards. Now the organ has 135 registers and 10,400 pipes.

In the mid 19th century, the church was equipped with new historicist furniture and underwent re-gothization in the years 1869-1908. The main altar is decorated with a Neo-Gothic retable from the mid 19th century.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

More Information

tourism.olomouc.eu

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maiko Shintani (2 years ago)
Beautiful church. We went not only the inside of it but also the tower. You can go up all the way up to the roof and see beautiful view of the city. I think it's one of good places to take an overview of the city. Although, the stairs looked half way collapsed from the middle. When we reached the top, it looked like closed because of a door-ish thing that is probably set to prevent rain coming inside of the tower but you can just push it to reach the top of the tower.
Michael Romero (2 years ago)
Beautiful church with a stunning interior. There are beautiful paintings inside and it was so quiet while we were there. One of the coolest things is you can climb the very ancient bell tower. I’m terrified of heights so it was a struggle but the views of Olomouc are beautiful.
George Graham (2 years ago)
Great ornate church with beautiful stained glass windows. Also, a great lookout tower with a great view of the city. Worth a visit!
Ondra Glaser (5 years ago)
Beautiful church with great opportunity to go on the top of the tower. For a small fee from the side, you can get one of the best views of Olomouc city center. Sadly the tower is closed most of the winter.
John R (7 years ago)
Do not be put off by austere exterior. The interior is ornate though dark. Largest organ in Czech Republic
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