Olomouc Castle

Olomouc, Czech Republic

The first written mention of the castle in Olomouc is included in the Cosmas Chronicle in 1055. The king Wenceslas III, the last Přemyslid, also stayed at the castle and was assassinated here in 1306. In 1767 the young Mozart stayed in the house of the Chapter Provost on the castle grounds and composed Symphony No. 6 in F major here. Some of the recent celebrities who have visited the site are Mother Theresa or Pope John Paul II.

After being partially damaged during the Thirty Years’ War, the medieval castle grounds were reconstructed in the Baroque style over a period of almost one century. Today, there remains little visible evidence of the significance and power of this castle. As time went on, the castle was overbuilt with religious buildings and the Wenceslas cathedral.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

More Information

tourism.olomouc.eu

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika Zoń (2 years ago)
The old town is a classic. Wonderful monuments, open churches to visit. Everything nearby. Peaceful, atmospheric, millions of eateries and delicious food. I would highly recommend
Roman Petrovskyi (2 years ago)
Good place
Petr Hopjan (5 years ago)
Zajimava vystava
George O´Harek (5 years ago)
Významné místo dějin českého státu z doby Přemyslovců. Zachovalé kamenné pozůstatky pův. hradu z 11. st. jsou dnes přístupné při návštěvě Arcidiecezního muzea. Postupně ( od r. 1141 ) toto místo bylo především novým sídlem moravského biskupství ( obnoveného r. 1063 ). Z tohoto období pochází nejcennější románské stavební památky. Gotickou dobu vedle katedrály prezentuje hlavně křížová chodba s pův. obrazovými výjevy a kaple sv Jana Křtitele.
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