The first written mention of the castle in Olomouc is included in the Cosmas Chronicle in 1055. The king Wenceslas III, the last Přemyslid, also stayed at the castle and was assassinated here in 1306. In 1767 the young Mozart stayed in the house of the Chapter Provost on the castle grounds and composed Symphony No. 6 in F major here. Some of the recent celebrities who have visited the site are Mother Theresa or Pope John Paul II.

After being partially damaged during the Thirty Years’ War, the medieval castle grounds were reconstructed in the Baroque style over a period of almost one century. Today, there remains little visible evidence of the significance and power of this castle. As time went on, the castle was overbuilt with religious buildings and the Wenceslas cathedral.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

More Information

tourism.olomouc.eu

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petr Hopjan (16 months ago)
Zajimava vystava
George O´Harek (17 months ago)
Významné místo dějin českého státu z doby Přemyslovců. Zachovalé kamenné pozůstatky pův. hradu z 11. st. jsou dnes přístupné při návštěvě Arcidiecezního muzea. Postupně ( od r. 1141 ) toto místo bylo především novým sídlem moravského biskupství ( obnoveného r. 1063 ). Z tohoto období pochází nejcennější románské stavební památky. Gotickou dobu vedle katedrály prezentuje hlavně křížová chodba s pův. obrazovými výjevy a kaple sv Jana Křtitele.
Josef Maňas (2 years ago)
Nádherná stavba viditelná už z dálky.Druhá nejvyšší věž v republice.Za zmínku stoji úžasné nástěnné malby,vnitřní zahrada.Je zde toto samozřejmě mnohem více.Zastavte se při cestě do Olomouce,nebudete litovat.
vilana marta (2 years ago)
looks lovely in night.
Fulvio Flamini (4 years ago)
Hidden from the main road, looks like a treasure to discover. Beautiful and dense of history.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.