St. Wenceslas Cathedral

Olomouc, Czech Republic

Saint Wenceslas Cathedral is a neo-gothic cathedral in Olomouc. The square was named after Saint Wenceslaus I, Duke of Bohemia on the thousandth anniversary of his death in 1935. The cathedral is also named after him.

The cathedral began in the Romanesque style and was consecrated in 1131. Extensive Gothic modifications were made in 13th and 14th century. Czech king Wenceslaus III of Bohemia was murdered in a nearby house of the former dean of the cathedral on August 4, 1306. Wenceslaus III was the last of the male Přemyslid rulers of Bohemia.

Gothic revival changes, which included refacing the building, rebuilding the west front and the construction of the central tower, were made during 1883–1892. These were designed by Gustav Meretta and R. Völkel. The cathedral's main tower is 100,65 metres high, making it the 4th tallest building in the Czech Republic.

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Details

Founded: 1131/1883
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ali Ali (13 months ago)
We visited during the week, when there were no one else there and a lovely gentleman offered to show us around and tell us more about the history of the cathedral. It was amazing! We were in absolute awe - just the amount of detail in the frescoes are unbelievable. Down in the crypt are several metal "coffins" with such intricate metal decoration. Just gorgeous. Pay attention to the cheeky self portrait 'bust' of the architect, right in the middle of the churches entrance way (outside), above the door in a gargoyle-style.
iTravel (16 months ago)
St. Wenceslas cathedral is massive! It is a beauty. I actually prefer Olomouc than Brno. I highly recommend visiting this church.
Ayat Alali (2 years ago)
Beautiful city
Jiri Antos (2 years ago)
Highly recommended ?
joby akkara (2 years ago)
Nice Church
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