Vranov nad Dyjí castle was first mentioned by Cosmas of Prague in 1100 as a border sentry castle. It was built by the Dukes of Bohemia to defend the southern border of Moravia against raids from the neighbouring Austrian March. Until 1323 the castle was in royal hands but in that year king John of Bohemia pawned Vranov to a powerful Bohemian nobleman, the viceroy Jindřich of Lipá.

In 1421, during the disturbances of the Hussite Wars the Bohemian noble family of Lichtenburg took control of the castle and the contiguous market town. In 1499 it definitely passed on to Lichtenburgs as hereditary possession by the king Vladislaus II of Bohemia and Hungary. The Lichtenburg family held Vranov for almost a century, until 1516.

In the 16th century, Vranov frequently changed the holders. Probably the most significant owners were lords from the Bavarian family of Althann, cousins of the Princes of Belmonte. Wolf Dietrich of Althann purchased the castle in 1614. Nevertheless seven years later the manor was confiscated due to his participation in the rebellion of the Bohemian Estates. The confiscated castle was consequently sold to one of the Albrecht of Valdštejn's generals, Johann Ernst of Scherfenberg.

Michael Johann II Althann recovered the Vranov estate for the family in 1680. He commissioned the famous Austrian architect Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach to design a grand hall, known as ‘the Hall of the Ancestors’ in the Baroque style as a memorial to his Althann ancestors. It was built between 1687 and 1695. It’s an oval construction surmounted by an imposing cupola and became a dominant feature of Vranov. An Austrian sculptor, Tobias Kracker, created large statues of the ancestors in niches around the walls and another Austrian artist, Johann Michael Rottmayr, painted an allegorical glorification of the Althann family in the cupola. To complement the Hall of the Ancestors with a spiritual element, Fischer von Erlach designed a Baroque chapel, the Chapel of the Holy Trinity, which incorporated an Althann family vault. The richly decorated chapel was built in two years (1699 and 1670). After the death of Michael Johann II Althann more grand buildings were constructed, completing the transformation of the original castle complex into an up-to-date Baroque chateau.

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Founded: c. 1100
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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Vojtěch Wostrý (2 months ago)
The castle in Vranov nad Dyjí is a large, beautiful, very ornate Baroque castle. It shows that its former owners (especially the Althann family) could afford unprecedented luxury for their time. The huge oval hall is breathtaking. The dining room and other parts open to the public are also very interesting. The castle is part of the national park and has beautiful surroundings - for example the adjacent forest park. You cannot park directly at the castle, you have to leave your car on the parking lot below and walk to the castle.
Jakub Vopenka (lightning gamer) (5 months ago)
Beutiful castle with great one hour tours. Would recommend. The tours were a little bit too long for me ?
Liam Guy Hiram Proven (5 months ago)
Best-preserved castle interior that I've seen so far in this country. Fascinating.
Tomas Cvrcek (5 months ago)
Very nice château, situate above the Dyje valley. Very scenic view. The guided tour was of appropriate duration: children remained engaged and even found it fun (it helped that the exposition includes an 18th century bathroom). Kind staff who gladly ushered us in even though we arrived quite late in the day.
EAST SEA PRAHA (2 years ago)
Romatic and nice castle
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