Hardegg Castle was first mentioned in an 1145 deed, it was acquired by the Counts of Plain about 1187. Hardegg itself is first documented as a town in 1290. Located on the border with the Kingdom of Bohemia, the area was devastated during the Hussite Wars in 1425. In 1483 Hardegg was bequeathed to the Habsburg archdukes of Austria.

Emperor Maximilian I granted Hardegg to his ministeriales of the Prueschenk noble family and elevated them to immediate Counts of Hardegg in 1499. Two years later Count Ulrich purchased the Bohemian County of Kladsko from the Dukes of Münsterberg. From the Thirty Years' War onwards the castle decayed, until it was acquired by the Khevenhüller dynasty and rebuilt in the late 19th century according to plans designed by Carl Gangolf Kayser.

After World War II until the fall of the Iron Curtain, Hardegg was particularly isolated. The only connection to the Czech Republic is via a bridge built in 1874 across the Thaya to the neighbouring village of Čížov.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

CalantheCintra (16 months ago)
Amazing walk! 12.5 km of rougher terrain, however, that view is worth it! We followed red.
Ondrej Shanel (2 years ago)
Castle which you should visit if you love middle age. Fee is only 7.5€ per adult person. It is not guided tour. You can reach almost any room at the castle - dinning hall, chapel, east tower, summer and winter kitchen. There is a huge exhibition about mexican emperor Ferdinand Maxmilian with lot of artifacts. Toilets are there as well and small working place for ca 10 cars.
Nataliya Nechytaylo (2 years ago)
Very impressive outside, not much to see inside. Maybe a guided tour is needed?
Sergej F (2 years ago)
Very good castle. It really looks total medieval place. There is a lot of beautiful surroundings for a walk.
Robert Kucera (2 years ago)
Amazing place...
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