The Cistercian Abbey of Zbraslav was one of the most significant monasteries of the Cistercian Order in the Kingdom of Bohemia. Founded by King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia in 1292 it became the royal necropolis of the last members of the Přemyslid dynasty. The abbey was abolished by the Bohemian King and Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II in 1789. The best-known abbot of this monastery was Peter of Zittau († 1339) who wrote the Zbraslav Chronicle, the most important historical source for the history of Bohemia in the first half of the 14th century. The Zbraslav abbey is also known for the Madonna of Zbraslav, an outstanding Gothic painting from the 1340s.

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Founded: 1292
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Jan Mitiska (2 years ago)
Zámek zvenku hezký, je ale zavřený, stejně jako většina parku
Renata Koubová (2 years ago)
Krásný zámek
Vladimír Kraus (3 years ago)
Kostel přístupný při bohoslužbách a (snad) v neděli odpoledne. Zámek nepřístupný, zámecký park částečně ano.
Alena Musilova (3 years ago)
Zbraslavský klášter zaujímá významné místo v naší historií,co se týká rodu Přemyslovců.Jen jejich hrobky jsou podle mého názoru málo důstojné.
Jakub Holovský (3 years ago)
Nothing to see. Almost everything is closed to the public. Seems to be nice looking and well maintained but for visitors not a place to be welcomed at.
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