All Saints' Church is a chapel located in the Prague Castle complex. The site of the church was originally consecrated in 1185 and a Romanesque building built; the oldest parts of the current building date to a structure constructed by Peter Parler in the 14th century.

Although originally free-standing, the church was badly damaged in an 1541 fire which engulfed the palace and church. Through subsequent successive rebuildings and enlargements, the church became physically integrated with the palace, specifically Vladislav Hall.

The church holds the tomb of St. Procopius and his life is depicted on paintings on the walls. Although accessible from Vladislav Hall, the church is generally only open to the public during religious services and concerts.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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en.wikipedia.org

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Antonin Halek (3 years ago)
Antonin Halek (3 years ago)
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Vladimir Pecha (4 years ago)
Jestli jsem byl z návštěvy Slivence nadšen, prohlídka zdejšího kostela byla vrcholem celodenního výletu. Navíc jsem měl štěstí, nejenže byl otevřen, ale na kůru probíhala malá zkouška, tak jsem si mohl vychutnat krásný zvuk varhan nesoucí se kostelem. Takový neoficiální koncert pro jednoho. Přitom jsem měl dostatek času si prohlédnout vnitřní vybavení této nádherné stavby. Nejstarší část kostela pochází ze 13 století. V roce 1693 byla přistavěna předsíň a v roce 1889 byly provedeny úpravy podle návrhu Antonia Barvitia. Presbyterium je uzavřeno pěti stranami osmihranu a nemá žádné vnější opěrné sloupy. Samotné presbyterium snad dříve sloužilo jako kaple a loď byla postavena později. Hlavní oltář je dřevěný a zhotovil jej roku 1901 řezbář Petr Bušek ze Sychrova. Nad vstupem do lodi je vystavena kruchta a nad ní v rohu kostela věž. Pozornost si zaslouží především čtvercový pilíř pod kruchtou, který podepírá věž kostela. Kolem pilíře vedou točité schody na kruchtu, kde jsou umístěny varhany postavené J. Schiffnerem v roce 1886. Kolem kostela je gotická ohradní zeď, do níž byla roku 1790 vestavěna klasicistní márnice se sochami sv. Doroty a Piety. If I was excited about visiting Slivenec part of Prague, the tour of the local church was Nirvana-like culmination of a day trip. Moreover, I was lucky not only to finf the church opened, but a small rehersal took place on the church, so I could enjoy the beautiful sound of an organ reverbing through a church. Such an unofficial concert for one. At the same time, I had plenty of time to inspect the interior of this beautiful building. The oldest part of the church dates back to the 13th century. In 1693 an entrance hall was built and in 1889 the modifications were made according to the design of Antonio Barvitia. The Presbyterium is enclosed by five sides of the octagon and has no external support pillars. The Presbyterium itself had previously served as a chapel and the nave was built later. The main altar is wooden and was made in 1901 by carver Petr Bušek of Sychrov. Above the entrance to the nave there is a organ loft and a tower in the corner of the church above it. The square pillar below the organ loft, which supports the church tower, deserves particular attention. There are spiral stairs around the squared pillar, where the organ built by J. Schiffner in 1886 is located. This is a quiet unique architectonic solution. The church is enclosed by a Gothic fence wall, into which a classicist morgue was built in 1790 with statues of St. Dorothea and Pieta.
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