The centrepiece of the Tielt market square is the belfry, which is the only remnant of the cloth hall. Its carillon was built by the du Mery brothers from Bruges in 1773. It has 36 bells with a total weight of 831 kilograms. It’s the only complete du Mery carillon in Flanders. The belfry is classified by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

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Address

Markt 30, Tielt, Belgium
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Founded: 1773
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Berlinde Gils (2 years ago)
Very nice apartment and the breakfast was fine. The owner was very friendly and you could always contact her via Whatsapp.
Ramona Pruteanu (2 years ago)
Modern, tasteful, very friendly! Thanks a lot!
Johan Vandekerckhove (3 years ago)
Beautiful and a wonderful hostess !!
francois claassens (3 years ago)
Wonderful newly renovated apartments, friendly and helpful owners, and 100% recommended. Best stay ever, just a short walk to centre of town, shops and restaurants.
Didier Nulens (3 years ago)
Ik verbleef professioneel ongeveer een jaar in het Sleutelhuys. Het bijzondere kader, de attentvolle eigenaars en de centrale ligging in het centrum maken deze plaats een uniek verblijf. I lived professionally about one year in het Sleutelhuys. The original setting, the sence of hospitality of the owners and the central location make this well equipped appartments a unique place to stay, both professionally or for leisure.
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Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.