The centrepiece of the Tielt market square is the belfry, which is the only remnant of the cloth hall. Its carillon was built by the du Mery brothers from Bruges in 1773. It has 36 bells with a total weight of 831 kilograms. It’s the only complete du Mery carillon in Flanders. The belfry is classified by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

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Markt 30, Tielt, Belgium
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Founded: 1773
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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Didier Nulens (18 months ago)
Ik verbleef professioneel ongeveer een jaar in het Sleutelhuys. Het bijzondere kader, de attentvolle eigenaars en de centrale ligging in het centrum maken deze plaats een uniek verblijf. I lived professionally about one year in het Sleutelhuys. The original setting, the sence of hospitality of the owners and the central location make this well equipped appartments a unique place to stay, both professionally or for leisure.
joeri biebuyck (2 years ago)
Ff
Jan Barnhard (2 years ago)
Heerlijk onthaasten in luxe.
Marcos Najera (3 years ago)
Recomendable 100%
Kevin Welch (4 years ago)
Wonderfully receptive family who runs the B & B. Very nice modern renovation inside the unit which we had. Nice place to stay as a home base when touring Gent and Brugge.
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Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.