The Palace of Queluz is a Portuguese 18th-century palace located at Queluz in the Lisbon District. One of the last great Rococo buildings to be designed in Europe, the palace was conceived as a summer retreat for Dom Pedro of Braganza, later to become husband and then king consort to his own niece, Queen Maria I. It served as a discreet place of incarceration for Queen Maria as her descent into madness continued in the years following Dom Pedro's death in 1786. Following the destruction by fire of the Ajuda Palace in 1794, Queluz Palace became the official residence of the Portuguese prince regent, John VI, and his family and remained so until the Royal Family fled to the Portuguese colony of Brazil in 1807 following the French invasion of Portugal.

Work on the palace began in 1747 under the architect Mateus Vicente de Oliveira. Despite being far smaller, the palace is often referred to as the Portuguese Versailles. From 1826, the palace slowly fell from favour with the Portuguese sovereigns. In 1908, it became the property of the state. Following a serious fire in 1934, which gutted the interior, the palace was extensively restored, and today is open to the public as a major tourist attraction.

One wing of the palace, the Pavilion of Dona Maria, built between 1785 and 1792 by the architect Manuel Caetano de Sousa, is now a guest house allocated to foreign heads of state visiting Portugal.

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Founded: 1747
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Portugal

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rui Pedro (6 months ago)
Disabled people friendly place Splendid and majestic rooms A very very pleasant garden with some masterpieces. Really worth a visit. Requires some time to be fully enjoyed
Jonathan Tanner (7 months ago)
Amazing palace that's really worth a visit.
Fernando Madeira (7 months ago)
Thr garden its a beautiful and relaxing place. The palace its just a huge place with old furniture
David Carcamo (8 months ago)
Beautiful grounds, 10€ to get in and see everything, some horses too!
Raluca Margarit (8 months ago)
A good place to visit during pandemic. Very nice chandeliers in almost every chamber. Don't miss the gardens, you can lose yourself for some hours.
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