The Palace of Queluz is a Portuguese 18th-century palace located at Queluz in the Lisbon District. One of the last great Rococo buildings to be designed in Europe, the palace was conceived as a summer retreat for Dom Pedro of Braganza, later to become husband and then king consort to his own niece, Queen Maria I. It served as a discreet place of incarceration for Queen Maria as her descent into madness continued in the years following Dom Pedro's death in 1786. Following the destruction by fire of the Ajuda Palace in 1794, Queluz Palace became the official residence of the Portuguese prince regent, John VI, and his family and remained so until the Royal Family fled to the Portuguese colony of Brazil in 1807 following the French invasion of Portugal.

Work on the palace began in 1747 under the architect Mateus Vicente de Oliveira. Despite being far smaller, the palace is often referred to as the Portuguese Versailles. From 1826, the palace slowly fell from favour with the Portuguese sovereigns. In 1908, it became the property of the state. Following a serious fire in 1934, which gutted the interior, the palace was extensively restored, and today is open to the public as a major tourist attraction.

One wing of the palace, the Pavilion of Dona Maria, built between 1785 and 1792 by the architect Manuel Caetano de Sousa, is now a guest house allocated to foreign heads of state visiting Portugal.

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Founded: 1747
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Portugal

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tetyana Husar (20 months ago)
Beautiful place, a lot to see, not many tourists in February. Oranges in the garden are delicious. Just go and pick it up
Sao Alves C. (21 months ago)
A beautiful place for the History lovers, but not only. The gardens provide an amazing walk among natural and human built wonders. You really can't miss it :)
Susan Marsh (21 months ago)
The Palace and gardens of Queluz are amazing and a must see if in Lisbon. The throne room alone is worth the visit. When you see the pictures of how it was before they started the renovations you can appreciate just how much work has been undertaken. Lots of information in English and lots of parking and a modern coffee shop which extended out onto the Palace terrace. We went on a Sunday afternoon in October and spent about 4 hours there. As i say, a must see and located (by car) about 40 minutes away from Lisbon.
Joe Ng (2 years ago)
If you’ve ever been to Versailles or explored any of the palaces in Austria, then this place will remind you of all your other palace adventures. In terms of scale, don’t expect Versailles, or even Schönbrunn in Vienna. Visit with an open mind and in weather for a stroll outside and you’ll be pleasantly surprised that such an experience was even possible half an hour away from downtown Lisbon. I visited in winter and the mild sunny weather was absolutely enchanting for the final stroll through the gardens at the end of the self-guided tour. There are helpful multimedia guides provided free of charge to give your trip context and appreciation.
David Andrews (2 years ago)
Not one of the most famous tourist attractions but absolutely worth visiting. The place has been restored (still some work going on) and includes period pieces of furniture and art. The grounds are spectacular and it is very relaxing to wander through the palace and the grounds. Without even noticing you learn a lot.
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