Rua Augusta Arch

Lisbon, Portugal

The Rua Augusta Arch was built to commemorate the city's reconstruction after the 1755 earthquake. It has six columns (some 11 m high) and is adorned with statues of various historical figures. Significant height from the arch crown to the cornice imparts an appearance of heaviness to the structure. The associated space is filled with the coat of arms of Portugal. The allegorical group at the top, made by French sculptor Célestin Anatole Calmels, represents Glory rewarding Valor and Genius.

Originally designed as a bell tower, the building was ultimately transformed into an elaborate arch after more than a century.

Because of the top cornice's great height, the figures above it had to be made colossal. The female allegory of Glory stands on a three-step throne and holds two crowns. Valor is personified by an amazon, partially covered with chlamys and wearing a high-crested helmet with dragon patterns, which were the symbols of the House of Braganza. her left hand holds the parazonium, with a trophy of flags behind. The Genius encompasses a statue of Jupiter behind his left arm. At his left side are the attributes of writing and arts.

The four statues over the columns, made by Victor Bastos, represent Nuno Alvares Pereira and Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, Marquis of Pombal on the right, and Vasco da Gama and Viriatus on the left. The two recumbent figures represent the rivers Tagus and Douro.

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Address

Rua Augusta 1, Lisbon, Portugal
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Details

Founded: 1755
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More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joshua Kaminski (19 months ago)
I love the archway. One of my favorite places in Lisbon. People gather for performances here too. Beautiful architecture. Good place to walk and romantic as well.
Mike R (20 months ago)
This is a very impressive monument. Good place to stop and linger for a bit. Note the tiling on the square. As with most places in Lisbon, it is very cool. Skip going to the top. Not worth the wait.
Dmitrij Santarovic (21 months ago)
Really great arch! It cost not a lot to get up the arch, but a view that opens there is stunning! Whole old town and a castle can be seen from here! Really qorth paying this little money! Moreover, the mechanism of a clock is put to display, so any one interested of clock mechanisms may be interested. A place worth visiting!
Samantha Symonds (21 months ago)
This arc is much bigger than you would initially think, but walking up to this monument is very overpowering at first. It is a great place for pictures and it has gorgeous artistic details. You can go to the top of the monument but views just from the base are good enough (and they are free from the ground). It has great angles from either side, one faces the city and the other faces the ocean. Take some time to walk around that plaza as well, great places to sit and people watch while you bask in the beauty of this architectural dream.
Claire Lemiski (2 years ago)
If you have time, it's worth the 3€ to go up to the top of this monument. Great views of the square and street below, as well as a panorama of the city. You take an elevator first, then climb two sets of narrow stairs. Use the light system to know when it is safe to ascend or descend.
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