Rua Augusta Arch

Lisbon, Portugal

The Rua Augusta Arch was built to commemorate the city's reconstruction after the 1755 earthquake. It has six columns (some 11 m high) and is adorned with statues of various historical figures. Significant height from the arch crown to the cornice imparts an appearance of heaviness to the structure. The associated space is filled with the coat of arms of Portugal. The allegorical group at the top, made by French sculptor Célestin Anatole Calmels, represents Glory rewarding Valor and Genius.

Originally designed as a bell tower, the building was ultimately transformed into an elaborate arch after more than a century.

Because of the top cornice's great height, the figures above it had to be made colossal. The female allegory of Glory stands on a three-step throne and holds two crowns. Valor is personified by an amazon, partially covered with chlamys and wearing a high-crested helmet with dragon patterns, which were the symbols of the House of Braganza. her left hand holds the parazonium, with a trophy of flags behind. The Genius encompasses a statue of Jupiter behind his left arm. At his left side are the attributes of writing and arts.

The four statues over the columns, made by Victor Bastos, represent Nuno Alvares Pereira and Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, Marquis of Pombal on the right, and Vasco da Gama and Viriatus on the left. The two recumbent figures represent the rivers Tagus and Douro.

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Rua Augusta 1, Lisbon, Portugal
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Founded: 1755
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More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aline Corsino (4 months ago)
Splendid! The Rua Augusta Arch is a stone, triumphal arch-like, historical building and visitor attraction in Lisbon, Portugal, on the Praça do Comércio. It was built to commemorate the city's reconstruction after the 1755 earthquake.
Ben Goeke (5 months ago)
Even if it's almost December, this place is still stunning
Yuval Tutka (7 months ago)
Nice square nice view of the sea.. and shops all around.. Nice place to take a pic to say you are here in Lisbon
Aleks Moylan (7 months ago)
As arches go. Very good
Joel Nolette (13 months ago)
A must-see site in Lisbon, and thankfully it's one you can't really miss. Encarved on the Arch are four key figures in Portuguese history, and the Arch faces the Tagus, welcoming visitors. The plaza in front of the Arch has many places to eat and explore, so be sure to swing by and allot some time for it when you are in the city!
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