Rua Augusta Arch

Lisbon, Portugal

The Rua Augusta Arch was built to commemorate the city's reconstruction after the 1755 earthquake. It has six columns (some 11 m high) and is adorned with statues of various historical figures. Significant height from the arch crown to the cornice imparts an appearance of heaviness to the structure. The associated space is filled with the coat of arms of Portugal. The allegorical group at the top, made by French sculptor Célestin Anatole Calmels, represents Glory rewarding Valor and Genius.

Originally designed as a bell tower, the building was ultimately transformed into an elaborate arch after more than a century.

Because of the top cornice's great height, the figures above it had to be made colossal. The female allegory of Glory stands on a three-step throne and holds two crowns. Valor is personified by an amazon, partially covered with chlamys and wearing a high-crested helmet with dragon patterns, which were the symbols of the House of Braganza. her left hand holds the parazonium, with a trophy of flags behind. The Genius encompasses a statue of Jupiter behind his left arm. At his left side are the attributes of writing and arts.

The four statues over the columns, made by Victor Bastos, represent Nuno Alvares Pereira and Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, Marquis of Pombal on the right, and Vasco da Gama and Viriatus on the left. The two recumbent figures represent the rivers Tagus and Douro.

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Rua Augusta 1, Lisbon, Portugal
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Founded: 1755
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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Stephen Kaplus (4 months ago)
This whole area is amazing. The monuments here along with the Arch and the square itself is wonderful, make sure you visit
Sam Christie (4 months ago)
Music playing - people chilling and hanging out - busy area - very pretty - lots to see and do
Abdullah Alaman (5 months ago)
Its an historical place people gather here in many festivals and there is river side also here yeah a good place to spend afternoon time with friends or family
keti gogishvili (6 months ago)
Rua-Augusta Arch is a historic stone building resembling the Triumphal Arch, dedicated to the reconstruction of the city after the earthquake (1755 year ). It has six columns, about 11 m high. Each is represented by a statue of a different historical figure. The middle of the arch is filled with the Portuguese coat of arms, as well as on the other side of the arch, you can find the city clock This arch borders the commercial square. It is one of the tourist sightseeing in Lisbon . Worth to visit
Aline Corsino (12 months ago)
Splendid! The Rua Augusta Arch is a stone, triumphal arch-like, historical building and visitor attraction in Lisbon, Portugal, on the Praça do Comércio. It was built to commemorate the city's reconstruction after the 1755 earthquake.
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