Santa Justa Lift

Lisbon, Portugal

The Santa Justa Lift is an elevator, or lift, in the civil parish of Santa Justa, in the historical city of Lisbon. Situated at the end of Rua de Santa Justa, it connects the lower streets of the Baixa with the higher Largo do Carmo (Carmo Square).

Since its construction, the Lift has become a tourist attraction for Lisbon as, among the urban lifts in the city, Santa Justa is the only remaining vertical (conventional) one. Others, including Elevador da Glória and Elevador da Bica, are actually funicular railways, and the other lift constructed around the same time, the Elevator of São Julião, has since been demolished.

The hills of Lisbon have always presented a problem for travel between the lower streets of the main Baixa and the higher Largo do Carmo. In order to facilitate the movement between the two, the civil and military engineer Roberto Arménio presented a project to the Lisbon municipal council in 1874.

In 1900, the formal contract was signed on which the working group was obligated to present a project for an elevator in a period of six months. On 31 August 1901, King Carlos inaugurates the metal bridge and awning. Yet, its operation would wait until 1902. Originally powered by steam, it was converted to electrical operation in 1907. After remodelling and renovation, on February 2006, the Elevator walkway was reopened for the general public and tourists.

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Details

Founded: 1902
Category: Industrial sites in Portugal

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Maka (5 months ago)
Really cool building, I would say it's worth the wait if you've got some time. There is a great view of Lisbon from the top of the lift. A tip is to go up using stairs and use the lift to get to the bottom if you don't necessarily want to use the elevator just to get up. If you do this, you'll skip the wait for the elevator because the line is just at the bottom of it. I recommend reading the lifts history while waiting to use it
Robert Deluria (5 months ago)
It’s a very good example of great engineering in the early 18th century. But you have to pay 5.30€ to get on it and there is a long line that will take you 10 to 15 minutes. The better option is the hike to the top and see the same view for Free. Good thing we took a free city tour and guide showed us the route to see the views on top.
Spiral Tote (6 months ago)
2002-present Four stars due to the fact that there is a fee and I feel it’s not necessary. The building looks lovely and is a work of art and architecture. There is a lift to get to the top, which is has a fee. However if you walk up to the museum, to the side, you can enter the tower for free and still walk around the top! Outstanding 360 panoramic views at the top. Access to restaurants and bars around the whole area.
Jeff Hwang (6 months ago)
If you have lisboa card, it is included in the card. There is very long line in the bottom. It is better to get in the elevator from the top. Also, view from the top is beautiful. Elevator is constantly getting good maintenance. Inside of the elevator was well kept. You should try once.
Harry B (7 months ago)
The building looks brilliant and is a work of art. There is a lift to get to the top, which is chargeable. However if you walk up to the museum, to the side, you can enter the tower for free and still walk around the top! Lovely 360 panoramic views at the top. Access to restaurants and bars around the whole area.
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