Santa Justa Lift

Lisbon, Portugal

The Santa Justa Lift is an elevator, or lift, in the civil parish of Santa Justa, in the historical city of Lisbon. Situated at the end of Rua de Santa Justa, it connects the lower streets of the Baixa with the higher Largo do Carmo (Carmo Square).

Since its construction, the Lift has become a tourist attraction for Lisbon as, among the urban lifts in the city, Santa Justa is the only remaining vertical (conventional) one. Others, including Elevador da Glória and Elevador da Bica, are actually funicular railways, and the other lift constructed around the same time, the Elevator of São Julião, has since been demolished.

The hills of Lisbon have always presented a problem for travel between the lower streets of the main Baixa and the higher Largo do Carmo. In order to facilitate the movement between the two, the civil and military engineer Roberto Arménio presented a project to the Lisbon municipal council in 1874.

In 1900, the formal contract was signed on which the working group was obligated to present a project for an elevator in a period of six months. On 31 August 1901, King Carlos inaugurates the metal bridge and awning. Yet, its operation would wait until 1902. Originally powered by steam, it was converted to electrical operation in 1907. After remodelling and renovation, on February 2006, the Elevator walkway was reopened for the general public and tourists.

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Founded: 1902
Category: Industrial sites in Portugal

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

vijay aditya (13 months ago)
Santa Justa lift is one of the favorite lookout spot of the city for an awesome view. The place is usually crowded during sunset as many people like capturing the picturesque city. The view also offers a beautiful view of Sao Jorge Castle.
Vimal Raj Kappil (19 months ago)
This is a world famous elevator in Central Lisbon – almost the best description would be that it is a stand alone structure of approximately 50 metres or so in height. One can purchase tickets and go to the top of the viewing arena/gallery at the top of the structure. The entire structure looks quite menacing to me actually because it is almost entirely made with steel, a bit cold in the middle of the warm coloured buildings of Lisbon. The view from the top is quite good- but nothing spectacular. Better vistas elsewhere. Definitely worth a visit though, but can be avoided if queue’s are unending.
Kristian Singh-Nergård (2 years ago)
The view from the top is excellent and it's not too crowded up there either. The wait for the elevator was long and in hindsight I would have been better off taking the stairs next to the museum in the back and crossed the bridge instead. The elevator itself has a few seats and it's like stepping 100 years back in time, like the rest of the tower.
Kristian Singh-Nergård (2 years ago)
The view from the top is excellent and it's not too crowded up there either. The wait for the elevator was long and in hindsight I would have been better off taking the stairs next to the museum in the back and crossed the bridge instead. The elevator itself has a few seats and it's like stepping 100 years back in time, like the rest of the tower.
Pip Zee (2 years ago)
So if you go to the other side of the street, there is a small entrance to a bar. If you take the elevator you can walk up to the lift without paying for entrance.. the view is just as good as all the rooftop bars. But the entrance is still very impressive. Even during Corona there was a waiting line.
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