Santa Justa Lift

Lisbon, Portugal

The Santa Justa Lift is an elevator, or lift, in the civil parish of Santa Justa, in the historical city of Lisbon. Situated at the end of Rua de Santa Justa, it connects the lower streets of the Baixa with the higher Largo do Carmo (Carmo Square).

Since its construction, the Lift has become a tourist attraction for Lisbon as, among the urban lifts in the city, Santa Justa is the only remaining vertical (conventional) one. Others, including Elevador da Glória and Elevador da Bica, are actually funicular railways, and the other lift constructed around the same time, the Elevator of São Julião, has since been demolished.

The hills of Lisbon have always presented a problem for travel between the lower streets of the main Baixa and the higher Largo do Carmo. In order to facilitate the movement between the two, the civil and military engineer Roberto Arménio presented a project to the Lisbon municipal council in 1874.

In 1900, the formal contract was signed on which the working group was obligated to present a project for an elevator in a period of six months. On 31 August 1901, King Carlos inaugurates the metal bridge and awning. Yet, its operation would wait until 1902. Originally powered by steam, it was converted to electrical operation in 1907. After remodelling and renovation, on February 2006, the Elevator walkway was reopened for the general public and tourists.

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Details

Founded: 1902
Category: Industrial sites in Portugal

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

藍海婷Hai Ting (15 months ago)
Its it one if the must do when you are in Lisbon. It's very easily accessed as it's bang in the middle of the main shopping street. It connects the lower level to the upper tier ( visit the church on the upper floor) if you are like us and didn't buy any tourist pass which includes this ...then you must get yourself herself a metro day pass (~€6 of you are planning on going about Lisbon ..take the tram and enjoy the view) as this pass includes the lift- buying tickets just for the lift is ~€5 so definitely worth buying the pass. Watch out for queues as there was A very long wait when I was there..it opens late so I would recommend coming back when it's slightly less busy
Maha El Nasser (15 months ago)
Loved this structure despite being fairly afeared of heights. Just about made it up the windy staircase to the top. Don't look down! Beautiful metal work. Also it's included on the 24 public transport pass, so definitely worth the €6.40 if you're planning on taking a bus at any point in the day as well.
nick cef (16 months ago)
Not sure I would bother waiting in line for a half hour or more, but the views are worthwhile. Architecturally unique. Be advised that once you exit the elevator at the top, you still need to go up a good number of steps to get to the lookout. Also, if you have a Via Viagem public transport card/pass, you can use it to ride the elevator. There is another small fee to access the rooftop lookout, though.
Eetu Pesonen (16 months ago)
Nice lift that gets you to an awesome view. Visited during evening and captured beautifully lighted Lisbon central. Lift ride itself takes maybe 35 seconds and it requires some walking through narrow stairs to get top of the lift for the views.
Michael Ewart (16 months ago)
Definitely worth a visit for the incredible view at the top. Pro tip: the ride up is included in your all-day public transportation pass. But you do need to pay an additional 1.50 euro to go up to the observation deck. Well worth it!
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