Situated high up in gardens on a gently sloped hill, the Belem Palace is the official residence of Portugal's president since 1910. It was built in 1559 and altered in the 18th century by King João V.

In 1755 King Jose I was inside the palace where the Great Earthquake was felt only to a slight extent, and just like most buildings in this area, it wasn't severely damaged. It still retains its richly furnished halls, carvings, tiles, and numerous works of art that may be visited on Saturdays only.

The Presidency Museum is part of the palace and can be visited every day except Mondays. tells the story of the Portuguese Republic and its Presidents, with a permanent collection explaining the history of the nationals symbols (flag and anthem) and the role of the presidents through photographs. In one gallery are portraits of every Portuguese president and in another are the gifts each received from world leaders and other prominent figures.

In front of the palace is a square with well-tended gardens and a statue of Afonso de Albuquerque, the Viceroy of India, standing atop a 20m-high Neo-Manueline pedestal in the center.

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Founded: 1726
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Portugal

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raluca (10 months ago)
The residence of the president of Portugal also housing the President's Museum.If you want a quick historic overview of Portugal's modern history and also see the gifts the president's received you can have a nice tour in about one hour.
Jose Carlos Ferreira (12 months ago)
2 stars only because one can't visit the place...
Majharul Alom Chowdhury (2 years ago)
Nice place
Majharul Alom Chowdhury (2 years ago)
Nice place
Yonathan Stein (2 years ago)
Looks nice from outside but I couldn't go inside since its open only Saturday. Tram 15E to get there from city center.
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