Little Castle (Mali grad) in Kamnik was constructed in the 11th or early 12th century at the strategic site above the narrow passage near an important trail. The Romanesque chapel of St. Eligius is one of the most important Slovene medieval monuments, despite later alterations, and is one of the oldest of its kind in Europe. The chapel features a wooden ceiling and exquisite fresco paintings.

Archaeological evidence indicates a cultic centre here in pre-Antiquity. The castle was first mentioned in 1202, but is of older origin. At the end of the 13th century, the castle burned; the northeast part was demolished and never rebuilt. The remainder of the castle was torn down in the 16th century after the earthquake of 1511, leaving only the three-storey Romanesque chapel built between the 11th and 15th centuries. One can still see the remnants of defensive walls and the recently restored defensive tower.

The first chapel of St. Margaret with a crypt, the presbytery of today's lower chapel, was built around 1100. When the nave was added, the Romanesque portal with a lunette was displaced. In the 13th century the chapel's second floor was built, dedicated to Bartholomew the Apostle, with a Gothic vault build after 1470. The lower chapel was than dedicated to St. Eligius, decorated again after 1771 with frescos by Janez Potočnik. The entire chapel was rebuilt in Baroque style around 1700. Inside there are also remnants of Gothic and Baroque frescos.

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Founded: c. 1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

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User Reviews

Matej Slapnik (16 months ago)
Mali grad je skalna vzpetina nad starim srednjeveškim jedrom Kamnika. Na griču stojita romanska kapela in razvaline gradu.
Samo Trtnik (2 years ago)
Čudovit razgled, še posebej zeleni srček ob katerem se lahko slikaš. Če objaviš na omrežjih z #visitkamnik delijo dalje.
Gilad Rave (2 years ago)
Beautiful
Luca De Boni (2 years ago)
Small fortress with a medieval Church. There is a beautiful view of the city
Giorgio Fonda (2 years ago)
Da un'altura a ridosso del centro abitato consente una vista panoramica della città.
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