Little Castle (Mali grad) in Kamnik was constructed in the 11th or early 12th century at the strategic site above the narrow passage near an important trail. The Romanesque chapel of St. Eligius is one of the most important Slovene medieval monuments, despite later alterations, and is one of the oldest of its kind in Europe. The chapel features a wooden ceiling and exquisite fresco paintings.

Archaeological evidence indicates a cultic centre here in pre-Antiquity. The castle was first mentioned in 1202, but is of older origin. At the end of the 13th century, the castle burned; the northeast part was demolished and never rebuilt. The remainder of the castle was torn down in the 16th century after the earthquake of 1511, leaving only the three-storey Romanesque chapel built between the 11th and 15th centuries. One can still see the remnants of defensive walls and the recently restored defensive tower.

The first chapel of St. Margaret with a crypt, the presbytery of today's lower chapel, was built around 1100. When the nave was added, the Romanesque portal with a lunette was displaced. In the 13th century the chapel's second floor was built, dedicated to Bartholomew the Apostle, with a Gothic vault build after 1470. The lower chapel was than dedicated to St. Eligius, decorated again after 1771 with frescos by Janez Potočnik. The entire chapel was rebuilt in Baroque style around 1700. Inside there are also remnants of Gothic and Baroque frescos.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Neza Rescic (13 months ago)
its not little, too many stairs
Nejc Černilogar (14 months ago)
Nice place, but maybe dangerous. Stay away from the walls.
Smriti (3 years ago)
A good spot to see the entire city...
Smriti (3 years ago)
A good spot to see the entire city...
Olga Godovnikova (3 years ago)
Nice view
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.