Franciscan Church of the Annunciation

Ljubljana, Slovenia

The Franciscan Church of the Annunciation is located on Prešeren Square in Ljubljana. Built between 1646 and 1660 (the bell towers following later), it replaced an older church on the same site. The early-Baroque layout takes the form of a basilica with one nave and two rows of side-chapels. The Baroque main altar was executed by the sculptor Francesco Robba. Many of the original frescoes were ruined by the cracks in the ceiling caused by the Ljubljana earthquake in 1895. The new frescoes were painted in 1936 by the Slovene impressionist painter Matej Sternen.

The front facade of the church was built in the Baroque style in 1703–1706 and redesigned in the 19th century. It has two parts, featuring pilasters with the Ionic capitals in the lower part and pilasters with Corinthian capitals in the upper part. The sides of the upper part are decorated with volutes and at the top of the front facade stands the statue of Our Lady of Loretto, i.e. Madonna with Child. It has been made of beaten copper by Matej Schreiner upon a plan drawn by Franz Kurz zum Thurn und Goldenstein. The faces and the hands were modelled by Franc Ksaver Zajec. The statue replaced an older wooden statue of a Black Madonna in 1858. The facade also has three niches with sculptures of God the Father above the main stone portal, and an angel and the Virgin Mary in the side niches, work by the Baroque sculptor Paolo Callalo. There is a stone entrance staircase in front of the church. The wooden door with reliefs of women's heads dates to the 19th century.

Next to the church, squeezed next to Prešeren Square between Čop Street, Nazor Street and Miklošič Street, there is a Franciscan Monastery dating from the 13th century. The monastery is notable for its library, containing more than 70,000 books, including many incunabulae and medieval manuscripts. Founded in 1233, the monastery was initially located at Vodnik Square, moving to the present location during the Josephine reforms of the late 18th century.

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Founded: 1646-1660
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nataša .Ržek (2 years ago)
Best to visit before x-mas! Beautifull exhibition of x-mas crib
Jarrod Hunt (2 years ago)
You see a lot of churches and they all start to look a bit same same after a while, but this one really does stand out with it's pink facade and it's location in the middle of the city. Inside it is beautifully decorated as well. I busted on a Sunday morning whilst mass was on so didn't get to school as much as I would have liked. Worth a visit.
Łukasz Stachnik (3 years ago)
Great and vibrant part the city with beautiful church. Especially. church looks great during nights when it is illuminated.
Joanne Ciantar (3 years ago)
What a pleasant place. At first I wasn't going as I thought since I have seen other Churches... But the peacfullness is felt and not seen. In every church one can feel this if we only let our conscious do the work
Debi Slinger (3 years ago)
"There for mass plus our choir group sang" It was special to be here for a service and watch everyone come and go saying their prayers and blessings. Our choir sang several songs and fell in love with the ambience of the place. It's easily accessible and right in the centre of town. Free entry
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